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Thread: What Tillandsia for desert climate?

  1. #9
    feedme's Avatar
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    Thank you for all the great feedback. I will look up all of the suggestions to read more.
    Feed me Seymour.

  2. #10
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Found this photo of a Xerographica ... talk about a gorgeous plant!
    https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7061/...0d6c99277e.jpg

    (You need to get some of these, Kevin, so I can mooch one off of you! )
    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



  3. #11

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    Generally, seems like the Tillandsias that are ok with low humidity also prefer bright light or direct sunlight and have stiffer leaves that are more silver colored and scaly/fuzzy compared to other Tillandsias. I have a few like that but I still keep them in some kind of enclosure so the humidity stays up a bit longer after I spray them. T. tectorum is the fuzziest I've seen. There are large and small forms of this species. T. paleacea is another recommended to me.
    Last edited by chch; 05-28-2015 at 09:14 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SubRosa View Post
    And since this is a carnivorous plant forum it should be mentioned that one Puya species allegedly eats sheep! Puya chilensis, The Sheep Eating Plant!
    My nephew has mentioned this plant to me a couple times. I might get one, or a clump of them, just for fun.

  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DragonsEye View Post
    Found this photo of a Xerographica ... talk about a gorgeous plant!
    https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7061/...0d6c99277e.jpg

    (You need to get some of these, Kevin, so I can mooch one off of you! )
    I just finally caught this, Paul, but I agree! I've seen a friend's in bloom, and it's stunning.

    Quote Originally Posted by chch View Post
    My nephew has mentioned this plant to me a couple times. I might get one, or a clump of them, just for fun.
    Puyas are definitely interesting, eyecatching, and extremely drought-tolerant. However, talk about a monstrous beast of a plant. Over time it could easily fill a living room, not to mention the brutal spines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by corky View Post
    T.Bergeri might be worth looking at
    Agree. I have a friend who grows T. bergeri outside all year in Palo Alto, with no supplemental moisture. This included a 12 month period with only about 3 inches of rain. It's much cooler than the low desert, but that says a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chch View Post
    My nephew has mentioned this plant to me a couple times. I might get one, or a clump of them, just for fun.
    I should get this plant and find a little critter skull to put in with it and then watch my nephews and nieces faces when they see it.

  8. #16
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    I live in a desert as well. The sonoran desert gets pretty humid in the late summer and I grow them inside a swamp cooled house under skylights, so that's a boon, but its pretty dry the rest of the year. I've had a lot of good luck from Tillandisia capult medusae, and T. caliginosa. T. cacticola is difficult to find, but grows on cacti in the peruvian deserts and can take a lot of light and heat. Noted horticulturalists in Tucson are growing T. ehlersiana outside, but in pots.

    In general I would pursue tillandsias that have very succulent leaves, like T. capult medusae. You probably want to hit them with a good spray of water in between waterings to keep them hydrated, or set up a humidity tray underneath them. Good luck!
    Last edited by Sidgrowspings; 06-13-2015 at 08:47 AM.

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