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Thread: Cultivating Mexican Pinguicula

  1. #31
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Howdy jimscott,
    I've refreshed the formatting of that page, now.

    Of course, there are many different ways to successfully cultivate Mexican Pinguicula. I do it the way I do, because it works for me.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  2. #32
    jeff 2's Avatar
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    suite

    I cultivate my mexican ping here in FRANCE in mineral alcalin clayed substrate , in shade or in morning sunlight , watering in summer all the 15 days or the month , outdoor ; in winter no watering to 12-15c , indoor .

    jeff
    Last edited by jeff 2; 12-23-2010 at 01:15 AM.

  3. #33
    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Oh! I need to try some of my decomposing granite!

    Is this basic or acidic?

  4. #34
    jeff 2's Avatar
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    I think basic- alcalin ( following the elements)

    jeff

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    mobile's Avatar
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    I've tried various mineral based soil mixes for growing the few Mexican pings that I own and none of them have been particularly successful in my conditions. I now grow them in Levingtons multi-purpose compost, with some added perlite, and they grow like crazy.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 01-06-2011 at 06:58 PM.

  6. #36
    punpkinface's Avatar
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    Would someone post a link to the iron oxide powder? I googled it and found a scientific supplier, but I want to be sure I'm getting the right thing.

  7. #37
    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by punpkinface View Post
    Would someone post a link to the iron oxide powder? I googled it and found a scientific supplier, but I want to be sure I'm getting the right thing.
    There's quite a few listings for it on eBay. Seems to be approx $2.50/lb, cheaper for larger quantities but you wouldn't need much if it's only for a few plants.

    Iron oxide is used to help prevent chlorosis, but a good plant food will include chelated iron and other essential nutrients and elements.
    Last edited by mobile; 06-06-2011 at 01:13 AM.

  8. #38
    punpkinface's Avatar
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    Thanks Mobile.

    I ended up getting another brand of APS, since I couldn't find the Schultz. This one is 100% diatomaceous earth, as opposed to the Schultz brand's sintered Fuller's earth. Hopefully this won't cause any problems. The diatomaceous earth contains trace amounts of iron oxide, so that's a plus. I potted up a P. cyclosecta as my guinea pig. Now I'll wait and see.

  9. #39
    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by punpkinface View Post
    Thanks Mobile.
    This one is 100% diatomaceous earth, as opposed to the Schultz brand's sintered Fuller's earth.
    This is used in some cat litter used by some bonsai growers, see here: http://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basicscatlitter.htm. I'll be interested on how you get on with it. I thought it would be a suitable replacement for Seramis, which I have used in the past and still have P. gypsicola x moctezumae in a mix consisting of Seramis and a few other materials. But, unfortunately for me at least, diatomaceous earth didn't appear to be a like for like replacement and the ping didn't do well at all. Nowadays I just use multipurpose compost, preferably one with some John Innes in it and a bit of extra drainage. As with all plants though, I suspect that growing conditions will also influence medium type.
    Last edited by mobile; 06-11-2011 at 03:23 AM.

  10. #40
    Smile, it makes people nervous :) MH1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mobile View Post
    This is used in some cat litter used by some bonsai growers, see here: http://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics/Basicscatlitter.htm. I'll be interested on how you get on with it.
    I tried a spare P.esseriana in pure 'tesco lightweight cat litter' and it crashed an burned in my conditions. I now just use it as a component in soils - and it seems to be fine like that. Also, I found it was pretty nasty-smelling on its own- it was enough to make me feel queasy. It might have worked better if I kept the pot in more water, but for me at least it didn't work well.

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