User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 12 of 12

Thread: Ping Questions

  1. #9
    FarmerDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    1,355
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Would P. 'Sethos' be prone to chlorosis? Because I've noticed a good deal of the lower leaves loosing their color and turning a pale whitish peachy color, and then decentigrating. Is that basically chlorosis? How can i prevent that ?

  2. #10
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    z5/6, Rochester, NY
    Posts
    2,017
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm guessing chlorosis is when new leaves are a yellow color. Older leaves are usually hidden under newer ones, and get kinda yellowish, and I don't think that's un-normal. I think your plant is ok, unless the new leaves are the same color as the older ones.

    -Ben
    He who can, does. He who can't, teaches. -George Bernard Shaw
    I love these shirts!!!
    My Growlist
    My Webpage

  3. #11
    FarmerDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    1,355
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    nah, but it usually happens after it rains.

  4. #12
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,539
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Farmer Dave @ Dec. 01 2006,6:54)]Would P. 'Sethos' be prone to chlorosis? Because I've noticed a good deal of the lower leaves loosing their color and turning a pale whitish peachy color, and then decentigrating. Is that basically chlorosis? How can i prevent that ?
    Sounds like you are describing senescence. Senescence is the normal process of aging and dying the path leaves take until they are dead. Chlorosis would only be an issue if newer leaves were not becoming green, but were remaining extremely pale yellow, to almost white. Something commonly seen with lawn grass, where something had lain on the lawn blocking the light - visible once the offending object is removed.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •