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Thread: Ping Questions

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    I was wondering what chlorosis is, i read the word on Joseph's Ping site, and i was also wondering why some pings like/need calcium, and is it ok for the rest of the pings.

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    It's when leaves don't have enough chlorophyll and the leaves turn yellow. It can be caused by root damage, compaction, nutrient deficiency, poor root growth, etc.

    Joseph can answer the other Q, because i'm not a Pinguicula major All I know is that some Pinguicula grow in alkaline, calcerous substrate , and if you recreate their natural habitat you'll have happy plants

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Farmer Dave @ Nov. 30 2006,4:20)]I was wondering what chlorosis is, i read the word on Joseph's Ping site, and i was also wondering why some pings like/need calcium, and is it ok for the rest of the pings.
    JustLikeAPill is quite right about chlorosis. It being a yellowing of the leaves due to lack of chlorophyll production caused by lack of sufficient light, nutrient deficiency, physical damage, or some other environmental issue(s).

    In my experience, some Pinguicula species and/or hybrids of Mexican origin grow better with the addition of a small amount of sand-sized aragonite or crushed coral, placed in their root zone, perhaps for the calcium content, perhaps for some other issue altogether I have not seen any reports of experiments done to determine a cause and effect relationship. However, be careful about assuming that the pH of their natural habitat is higher than neutral. It may even be acidic, yet contain minute amounts of the dissolved calcium. And, too, consider their root systems are nearly always very small and don't extend very deeply into their soil. When I use aragonite or crushed coral blended into the media for those plants that respond well to its presence, I am fairly confident that it remains nearly insoluble. Calcium carbonate in these forms has a very low solubility at warmer temperatures, and gypsum (calcium sulfate) is generally of a neutral pH, or nearly so, and this is the form of calcium most often reported to comprise the substrate of Pinguicula in their native habitats. It does not appear to be outright toxic, but some plants, in my experience, have a positive response to its presence, others do not.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Think of it as a bleached coral.

    Joseph, would a very weak solution of Calcium Chloride and water sprayed on the foliage hurt? By weak, I mean like 15-25 parts per million or so.

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ Nov. 30 2006,7:22)]Think of it as a bleached coral.

    Joseph, would a very weak solution of Calcium Chloride and water sprayed on the foliage hurt? By weak, I mean like 15-25 parts per million or so.
    I don't know, as I've never tried anything like that. Give it a go on some expendable plants and let us know. BTW, what would be the reason for doing that?

    I use dilute fertilizer solution with trace elements at 40 ppm.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    .. For calcium?

    Just for the hell of it lol

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    Joseph:

    In your experience, which species are most prone to chlorosis? Also, which species respong most positively to calcium? Which do not?

    Thanks,
    Corey

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    For me the most prone to chlorosis are: Pinguicula agnata, Pinguicula sp. (Pachuca), and Pinguicula rotundiflora. There may be others, but those three stand out in my mind.

    The following is not a complete list (I am still working on that), but just off the top of my head: Pinguicula gypsicola, Pinguicula gracilis, Pinguicula rotundiflora, and Pinguicula 'Titan'. I have not yet seen any that appeared to be harmed by the inclusion of calcium bearing minerals in their media, even temperate species seem to be able to grow with or without it. One exception might be the S.E. USA species, but they grow just fine without calcium, so I haven't been bold enough to try them with any, yet.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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