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Thread: What would cause a P. caerulea to suddenly decline and die?

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I have a small transparent plastic food storage container, 1/2 filled with peat moss. About 3 years ago I sowed some Pinguicula caerulea seed into that peat moss. The seed promptly germinated and the plants progressed until they were about 1 cm in diameter. Since then the usual ubiquitous moss grew up to inundate the little [i}Pinguicula[/i] plants. Recently I plucked most of the moss from around the Pinguicula plants, spritzed them with my dilute fertilizer solution, and they have greened up and are beginning to grow again. I still don't have strong confidence that I will be able to transplant them and get them to grow to maturity (bloom and make more seed). But, it has happened many times before, just as often as there has been complete crop failure.

    If anyone else has kept plants in extended periods of suspended growth, and brought them out of it again, please let me know. I've been playing with this technique, in various ways, since I heard of it from Park Seed Co. in their seed germination handbook, several decades ago.

    The species of S.E. USA Pinguicula I have the most trouble keeping is Pinguicula planifolia. Hopefully someone who is very experienced with these species will respond to this thread.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 01-17-2007 at 06:40 PM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    Doesn't P. planifolia like it REALLY wet, like flooded sometimes?

    All I have to say about P. caerulea, is that mine flowered.

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Pinguicula planifolia is certainly often found underwater in its native habitat. Whenever I located any of this species in the wild, years ago, I almost always found it submerged in shallow ditches or depressions.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #12
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    So, generally speaking, Pinguicula planifolia, isn't one of the easier ones? Is it one that expects a reduced photoperiod, and/or colder temps, more than other N.A. pings? could that have been the cause of its demise?

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    Assuming!!! Shame JimScott!!! Who knows?? While most of you experience problems, I have good luck with mine. My P. planifolia are doing well in the circulating bog along with P. ionantha, and P. primuliflora, while P. caerulea has gone to that Great Bog in the Sky. My P. lutea recently decided to join it. Though the lutea was not in the circulating bog, it lasted many years before biting the bullet. Occasionally, I submerged my pings in their containers (circulating bog excepted) with good results. This year, I neglected to submerge P. caerulea and P. lutea, and that somehow ticked them off. They're gone now, but the string of curses that followed them to thier final resting place, still occasionally drips from my lips!!!!
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-01-2007 at 01:32 AM. Reason: Correction of scientific name
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    Mexican butterworts are nearly impossible for me to grow here in Florida. The SE U.S. Pings can be tricky. P. primuliflora and P. ionantha are by far the easiest. P. pumila is the devil.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-01-2007 at 01:31 AM. Reason: Correction of scientific name

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Mexican butterworts are uber-easy up here. They do well by a window sill, probably even better if I put a shoplite over them. And most people seem to struggle with P. primuliflora. Mine do well as a window sill plant.

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    The only problem that I have with Mexican Pings is that the rain bruises them too easily.

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