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Thread: Schultz APS, watering and succulent phase

  1. #9
    norns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Wilson View Post
    I ues the sand APS and did have an issue earlier in the year.I was keeping my gypsicolas in about 1" of water and staretd losing a few because of crown rot. I started just top watering them and letting the water accumulate in the shoe box and kept the water at a very low level.They have been doing great and no losses since then. I attribute my losses to warmer summer conditions and higher humidity
    Mark W.
    Hi wilson

    I also used to encounter root rot for this Ping with APS/sand mixture. Finally I keep the watering rate low (2-3 days top watering the edge of pot, avoid of watering the central crown) though summer leaf is growing. The soil is the same as APS/sand with very little amount of oyster shell powder. It grows well so far.

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylorguy View Post
    I need some people with experience to give me some advice. I recently changed to Schultz APS with a bit of sand mixed in for my mexican pings. Though a couple of them seem to be doing just fine, many others look average at best. Right now I am watering them on the tray method once the tray dries out, but I noticed that at times the APS seems to dry out much faster than soil (this makes sense).

    That being said, my first concern is watering. With APS, should I be only top watering, or is the tray method ok? How do I know how much is enough water?

    Second, I have never been through the succulent phase with mexican pings. I hear mixed advice; some keep them wet year round while others reduce watering. Which is it and when should I start changing the way I am growing them (if I need to). Just for some brief information, I have them growing under 6 T12 bulbs on about a 15 hour photoperiod. My sundews and nepenthes are thriving, but most of my mexican pings seem to be struggling. I thought they were supposed to be some of the easiest to grow!

    Thanks!

    Phil
    You haven't mentioned if you provide them any supplemental nutrients (fertilizer). If you do, please explain your technique, if not, I recommend you try some. I use very dilute solutions of several soluble fertilizers, and dustings of dried insect dust.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  3. #11
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    You haven't mentioned if you provide them any supplemental nutrients (fertilizer). If you do, please explain your technique, if not, I recommend you try some. I use very dilute solutions of several soluble fertilizers, and dustings of dried insect dust.
    Thanks Joseph - just now saw your post. To be perfectly honest with you, I am hesitant in trying anything other than watering. If you can tell me a pretty failproof way of supplementing my pings, I am all for it. I just don't trust myself. I lost my 'Sethos' to root rot because I flooded the APS... I have since cut back on water and noticed my launea, agnata, 'John Rizzi' and gigantea to be growing just fine after transplanting.

    Any advice you can give me is much appreciated. My thumb isn't green yet, but it will get there one day.

    Phil

  4. #12
    rattler's Avatar
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    get something like freeze dried blood worms from a tropical fish store.......kinda crush it between your fingers and lightly sprinkle it on the plants........unless you have alot of fruit flies and fungus gnats in your house there is actually very lil for pings to eat cause most cant catch something the size of a house fly.......one warning though, if you have a shellfish allergy DO NOT USE BLOOD WORMS! for some reason they will kick off this allergy in a big way.....
    cervid serial killer
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    I soaked the stuff when I first got it and mixed it in wet. Do not know if it makes a diff or not. I also used vermiculite instead of sand. So far the results are good. I used 50:50 in error(the person who recommended it said 2 APS " 1 vermiculite).

    Cheers,

    Joe

  6. #14
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone -

    Rattler, I will get some dried bloodworms today from the pet store and crush it as you recommended. I am still a bit mad at myself for losing 3 pings due to overwatering, but sometimes you have to make the mistake to learn from it. They are now looking on the upside of things.

  7. #15
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Wet is okay, if you balance the other environmental factors, such as temperature, air movement, humidity, media, fertilizer, etc., but especially light. For nearly a decade I grew all of my Mexican Pinguicula near the point of submersion. But since this past December 2007, I have scarcely watered them at all. However, I did not neglect giving them light. Most have been dry since then. Very few have died under these conditions, many are continuing to grow and bloom - though the plants themselves usually look near death. I plan to share photos and details soon.

    Learning to balance environmental factors, I find, is the most important concept to learn for success.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 10-13-2008 at 08:58 AM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #16
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    I would definitely be interested in seeing/hearing about your technique in depth.

    Phil

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