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Thread: My Pinguicula moctezumae is confused...

  1. #9
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    Wow, that's somethin' else. I actually just repotted mine into peat/sand/vermiculite mix this weekend. A few of the leaf tips began to turn brown, and the young leaves in the middle just weren't getting any bigger. I figured what is there to lose at this point?

    When I was repotting, I peeled back that tuft of fuzzy green moss at the base of the plant (see the pic above). It was pretty tight... maybe even constricting the roots? When I did this, noticed some tiny leaves (maybe even plantlets?) along the base of the root system. I thought that was pretty encouraging.

    I have my photoperiod at 11 hours right now, and I'm moving it down to 9 for the winter months to get my pygmy Drosera to produce gemmae. The plant is also about 6-7" below a set of four 32-watt T5 grow bulbs. It's not ideal, I know. If I ever expand my grow rack to a second shelf I'll be able to have one shelf that doesn't see as much of a reduced photoperiod. That would help for my Pinguicula and Nepenthes.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-13-2011 at 12:28 PM. Reason: N. A.

  2. #10
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Of course you know that all of these plants originated near the equator, where daylength changes very little, year-'round. It is always somewhere about eleven hours per day (shortening only a few minutes in Winter vs Summer).

    Anyway, I wish you great success with this species, it is really a delightful plant.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  3. #11
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    Yeah, I know they're from the equator. I suppose I was trying to find out if the drastically reduced photoperiod was seriously detrimental to the plant as opposed to simply... not great. I'm trying to strike a balance here since I'm trying to grow so many different types of plants in my rack.

  4. #12
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    My caution is this:
    They will grow and prosper with high light levels and long photoperiods, if they are watered and fertilized appropriately to the light/temperature levels. With high light levels, they will survive long periods of time even if they are not watered for a year or more (they won't look pretty, and it is tricky to bring them back to full-health), but they can survive a very long time with nothing except lots of strong light. I have come to believe that light is the most critical factor in successful Pinguicula cultivation. If you reduce their light intensity or photoperiod, it can be the quickest way to precipitate their succumbing to death by rot.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-13-2011 at 12:29 PM. Reason: N. A.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  5. #13
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I keep "preaching" lower photoperiod and know that Mexican Pinguicula are closer to the Equator than our N.A. temperate plants. So I googled Mexico daylength and about the closest I coul get was a comparison between Montana & Southern Florida. In there it stated that Southern Florida (which is roughly the same latitude as the north-south middle of Mexico) gets 13.5 hours of daylight in the month of June. That also means that it gets 10.5 hours in December. In other words, it does have some seasonal variation. FWIW, Montana gets 16 hours of daylight in June.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-13-2011 at 12:30 PM. Reason: N. A.

  6. #14
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I just picked San Louis Potosi (type location for P. potosiensis) and checked on the daylength, using a day length calculator, for 1 January (10h 48m) and 1 July (13h 27m) a difference of only 2hr 39m. While even here in Tucson the same info is, 1 January (10h 5m) and 1 July (14h 13m) a difference of about 4h 8m. That indicates a differential between my location and San Louis Potosi of 1h 29m. It may not seem like much, and is certainly less of a difference than the difference between North Dakota and San Louis Potosi. But there is an even more significant difference between the two, if other factors are taken into account. One of those factors that I feel is highly significant is the intensity of U.V. radiation. Closer to the equator is closer to the sun and often our beloved plants grow in high elevations as well. Bottom line: they are exposed to significantly higher levels of U.V. than could naturally be provided almost anywhere else on the planet, except at higher elevations elsewhere near the equator. Artificially it is relatively easy to duplicate both the photoperiod, high P.A.R. levels and the U.V. intensity using fluorescent lighting.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    Aloha Joseph,

    I had wondered about this in regards to UV light. I live in Hawaii at about 3500 feet elevation, my first attempt with Mexican Pinguicula was not successful. they sort of fried and died. They were kept shaded from the noon day sun and still seemed to get cooked. Suspecting that they came to me grown under artificial light and were not ready/adjusted to deal with massive UV light. Running some tests as i don't want to need to grow them indoors all the time. Seems that I can grow them outside as long as they are in my polycarbonate greenhouse that is supposed to block 90% of the UV. maybe they need to be gradually acclimatized? So step them up to more UV over time vs having them cook in the sun like the many tourists i see here on Maui that find our climate not so hot but are caught unaware of the massive UV exposure.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-13-2011 at 12:31 PM. Reason: N. A.

  8. #16
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    kulamauiman,

    Aloha - I lived in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Ford Island for two years, when I was in the U.S. Navy back in the mid-1970's. We also more recently visited Maui (about ten years ago), where my step-daughter had her wedding. There's a place, there on Maui, on the way up to the Haleakala valcano crater, where the climate seems nearly perfect for almost any CP.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    From all accounts I've read about these plants in their native habitats, almost without exception they are found where they see very little direct sunlight. I believe that you may be experiencing difficulty by providing too much direct light or natural light of too high an intensity.

    I am just now preparing plans, which I hope to use to build a small outdoor conservatory, in this conservatory, I plan to experiment with growing Mexican and other Pinguicula outdoors. I believe I can duplicate most environmental conditions, my major challenges will be to secure them from the mischief of birds, rodents, and various other typical plant pests - such as aphid, mealy bugs, wood lice, slugs, snails, and spider mites, etc. My main environmental challange will be to keep the Summer temperatures in the low 90's F -->and to keep it from climbing into the 100's F, where I expect the plants would then expire. I have a high-pressure fogging system, but hesitate to fog them with tap water, and expect it will use an exhorbitant amount of water if I R.O. purify it before using it to fog. Perhaps I will just set the fog to run on a thermostat during the hottest times of the day/year.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-09-2010 at 12:53 PM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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