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Thread: PROJECT: Mexican Ping Dripping Wall

  1. #17
    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kulamauiman View Post
    may want to look into how they build stucco homes. I seem to remember a thin plastic layer underneath, stretched over the wooden frame, then the matrix of wire over that and then the substrate.
    Yes, but the substrate will not stick if it is on the outside. It will wash off! It doesn't dry like stucco, you know. If I used soil it would have to be between the plastic and wire, not in front of it.

    Wait. I think I may see what you mean. You're saying to BUILD a replica of the rocky wall...with something that hardens into rock. I feel that's going to be hard because most concrete ect. has a high salt content...minerals you know. Maybe pings don't mind?

    ---------- Post added at 05:40 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:12 PM ----------

    OK. I'm sold. I'll use that felt for building greenwalls.

    However, now I have other questions! Shoddy felt, as this seems to be called...It would have to be a bit think. I'm not quite sure where to get it though. Does this seem suitable in any way?

    Now. Growing pinguicula in felt! I would water them with water passed through some sort of standard ping media, I suppose. I'm sure they need more nutrients than hair...but it's a good thing they can catch their own food.

    I'll be using a small pump on a timer. I'll have it water the minimum duration several times a day I assume, more in summer, less in winter. Maybe I'll get a digital timer in place of a mechanical one.

    Is there any aditive to the water that would be good for pings? Dilute ferts instead of a slurry of ping media? Should the water be alkaline, or acidic?

    Has anybody tried hydrophonics with pinguicula? P. gigantae seems a good choice since it doesn't require winter dormancy I've heard.

    HELP!!!

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    jeff 2's Avatar
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    suite

    like the others mexican ping , gigantea have need a dormancy period .

    P.gigantea is a carnivorous plant they have need also to alive insect like all these plants genus.

    rather alcalin water.

    a mineral substrat is not a start of hydroponics ?


    this wall is a interressant project ,for me no adapted to the pinguicula but for common green plant yes if you love ( like your picture)

    jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    like the others mexican ping , gigantea have need a dormancy period .

    P.gigantea is a carnivorous plant they have need also to alive insect like all these plants genus.

    rather alcalin water.

    a mineral substrat is not a start of hydroponics ?


    this wall is a interressant project ,for me no adapted to the pinguicula but for common green plant yes if you love ( like your picture)

    jeff
    I beg to differ on the dormancy. From what I have read, p. gigantea produce only carnivorous leaves. They just shrink in size while resting. So while they may have a weak dormancy requirement, they are not quite like other mexican pinguicula. Please correct me if I am misinformed.

    I understand that the wall did not work for you or for many other people. But I would like to try again. I believe that if set up properly, it will work for p. gigantea. Whether I have to create a sort of verticle pot instead of hydrophonics I do not know. That is my question. I

    Thank you for understanding. If you can help me along the way, please contribuite. If this wall fails, let the administrators sticky it as something that should not be tried again...but I'm willing to try. If all else fails, I will have something interesting to sell at the local garage sale.

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    swords's Avatar
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    SDCP they have this stuff called EcoWeb for growing orchids and other epiphyte plants on a drip wall. It's sold in a large sheet 45" x 57" here:

    https://www.firstrays.com/cgi/cart/c...=326&keywords=

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    Thank you, Swords. I amy be going to a hydrophonics shop today to see what they reccomend. I'm just gathering opinions before I make the purchases.

    But thanks!!!

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    No problem I've had that link forever but never had a chance to order / use it yet. Looks like an awesome project - I love this kinda thing!

  7. #23
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    I feel like this isn't the one I had in mind, but take a look at this blog: http://www.livingwallart.com/
    You should be able to find some ideas here; they write about all sorts of different techniques.
    As for P. gigantea, they don't seem to have a dormancy like the Mexican Pings. But they do slow down in growth when it gets cool, and when that happens I tend to cut back on the watering a bit just as a precaution.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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    Thank you Joe.

    Guys: I bought a 1' by 4' slab of 1.5" thick rockwool today. This is not nearly enough for a full sized wall, but I'm thinking it'd be good to expirement on a mini wall.

    Facts about rockwool that will apply to me:

    • Rockwool is a horticultural growing media made from the natural ingredients Basalt rock and Chalk. These are then melted at 1600 C into a lava which is blown into a large spinning chamber, which pulls the lava into fibers like "cotton candy." If you have ever visited a volcano you have probably seen these fibers flying around in the air surrounding the volcano. Once the fibers are spun they are then compressed into a mat which is then cut into slabs and cubes.
    • Horticultural Rockwool growing media is primarily available in two general formats. First, as rigid slabs, blocks, and cubes known as "bonded" products because the fibers are held together with a "gluing" or binding agent which renders them stiff and brittle.
    • The most important characteristic of all formed rockwool lies in the fact it allows growers to quickly respond to fluctuations in the plant's rooting environment. The rockwool being an inert media means that rockwool fibers do not modify or restrict the availability of nutrient to the plants. Due to this zero Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), the material can be leached of all fertilizer "salts."
    • After excessive soaking, the slab will drain sufficiently, in a short period of time, so that 40-50% of the pore space is occupied by air. Since it has an almost zero absorbtion capacity for water.
    • Slabs are the premium product for vegetable cropping. They are available wrapped in UV resistant polyethylene sleeves for ease of use. The special structure provides a uniform environment allowing plant roots to rapidly explore all the available growing volume for a quick start. Water and nutrient distribution is also more uniform and provides a larger effective rooting volume than previously possible. Slabs come in 36" lengths and 3" heights and have two different sizes of widths. The 6" slab is suitable for crops that do not tend to require a very large root capacity. The 8" slab is mainly for extremely vigorous crops such as cucumbers that require a strong and stable base and a large root capacity. The Slabs are easy to use just cut holes in the top of the slab set your cubes on top and cut a few slits in the bottom of the slab's plastic for drainage.


    From: http://www.hydroponics.net/learn/rockwool.asp

    This lack of water absorbtion will be both good and bad. Maybe it will be superior to felts which must retain a great ammount of water...but I must water it automatically several times a day I assume.

    Since this media has NO nutrients, I will have to add SOMETHING to the water...dilute fertilizer? Run the water through decomposing granite or limestone? Regular ping media? And I'll have to feed the plants by hand if they're not catching much I assume.

    Any thoughts?

    ---------- Post added at 09:24 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:59 PM ----------

    How about this as a solution?:



    My brother thought of this: make tapered media pockets in the rockwool, with small openings in front for the pings and larger ones in back. This might just be the answer, but what to fill it with! That is the question.

    Let me know what you guys think!

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