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Thread: Cold hardy Pings?

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    cpsammich's Avatar
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    Cold hardy Pings?

    What (if any) Pings can survive zone 7a outside all winter?
    Thanks

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    mass's Avatar
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    Umm.. I know we have P. vulgaris in the wild here. And we are a zone 5b in the areas where they are found.

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    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq7450.html

    I would *assume* that any in same hardiness regions would do fine. I would imagine a lot of them found in northern regions aren't as good with any hot summer weather and those found more south of you don't appreciate any frost/colder winter weather.

    Just a guess though.
    -Josh
    Grow list

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpsammich View Post
    What (if any) Pings can survive zone 7a outside all winter?
    Thanks
    Winter temps in zone 7 are no problem for the real hardy Pinguicula species like P. macroceras, P. grandiflora, P. vulgaris and several more.

    Where are you located / name of a big town in your area?

    In general, USDA zone 7 is where a lot of hardy Pinguicula species grow in nature and the problem for hardy Pinguicula is not the cold in winter, it's more the heat in summer they cannot survive on the long run.

    This is the climate table where I live:
    http://www.worldweather.org/016/c00055f.htm#climate
    P. macroceras and P. grandiflora are doing very well here outdoors all year round in my mini-bog.

    What's your climate table on http://www.worldweather.org ?

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    cpsammich's Avatar
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    Im in Virginia around 30 miles south of DC in the United States

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpsammich View Post
    Im in Virginia around 30 miles south of DC in the United States
    So your climate should be something between
    Washington DC http://www.worldweather.org/093/c00270f.htm#climate and
    Richmond Virginia http://www.worldweather.org/093/c00816f.htm#climate
    Thats not a big difference.

    But compare with my table of Hamburg, Germany http://www.worldweather.org/016/c00055f.htm#climate

    The difference is not so big in the coldest winter month (January), but it is big in the hottest summer months (July/August). In your area the "average daily minimum" is nearly as high as in my area the "average daily maximum", daily average in summer is much higher!

    Those high summer temperatures are a problem for hardy Pinguicula, as they come from mountain regions.

    I don't know if you can keep them on the long run. From the species that I know personally (P. macroceras, P. grandiflora, P. vulgaris) I would try P. grandiflora first, as they can withstand a little bit (but not much) higher summer temps than the two others and they are offered often.

    Perhaps some hardy Pinguicula species from Spain can withstand even higher summer temperatures, but I don't know for sure (those species are seldom offered, even here in Europe and I don't have them).

    And I'd try to keep them in full shade all day long during the two hottest months of the year and perhaps provide a shower of cool water in the evenings, if you want to give it a try.

    BTW: I'm wondering where you can purchase hardy Pinguicula in the States. I have looked around the CP nurseries as somebody on Terraforums had asked me, but at most I could find temperate species like P. lutea or P. primuliflora, which cannot withstand hard frost as the come from the U.S. Sun Belt.

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    cpsammich's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice I'll try those three
    Thanks again

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    suite

    Bonjour

    in the 7 zone all temperate species are OK , attention to the substrate , some one love alcaline substrate ,some others acid substrate ( see here my web site translate with google modul)

    here to LE MANS in FRANCE I cultivate almost all these species always outdoor , in shade and in a wet substrate.

    attention for the subtropical US( pumila-caerulea-lutea-primuliflora-ionantha-planifolia) ,they do not like negative temperatures,they do not grow by the same way also.

    I can swap or give free some temperate , PM please .

    jeff
    Last edited by jeff 2; 08-15-2011 at 11:48 PM.

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