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Thread: pinguicula species

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    jeff 2's Avatar
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    pinguicula species

    may be you know some common mexican species and some horticol hybrids but the others ( for instant)

    mexican

    50-60 taxons

    andine

    6 taxons

    cuban-caraibe

    14 taxons

    subtropical US

    6 taxons

    temperate

    40-50 taxons

    may be we could talk about them from time to time(growing 'ex situ', meeting 'in situ' , etc) , what do you think of it ?

    jeff

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    subtropical US:

    P. planifolia
    P. caerulea
    P. lutea
    P. pumilla
    P. ionatha
    P. primulifolia

    This right?

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    jeff 2's Avatar
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    write P.pumila ,P.ionantha , P.primuliflora

    Yes, with may be on these species some form or variety (often on the color morphological caracters) , like P.pumila var buswellii ( yellow) ; P.caerulea var leucantha ( white) or P.lutea f alba ( white) , perhaps on the others species also (must be sought 'in situ' ).

    if you have some picture of these form or variety 'in situ' I am taker

    jeff

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    Yes, I was afraid my memory did not hold the correct spellings

    I have never seen any CP "in situ", which I suppose means in habitat. Unfortunately I have no photos to share. I only have plants in my collection to photograph. San Diego is a long way from most CP sites.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    may be we could talk about them from time to time(growing 'ex situ', meeting 'in situ' , etc) , what do you think of it ?
    It's not my thing to travel the world and visit Pinguicula "in situ".

    But I'm always ready when it comes to talk about growing "ex situ" of cold-temperate Pinguicula.

    With Mexican species I'm not very experienced, I only have two hybrid species ("Weser/Sethos", "Tina"), so I perhaps cannot contribute much to Mexican hybrids or species.

    With a very few of hardy Ping species I'm really experienced, such like P. macroceras ssp. nortensis that I already showed in this forum. If anybody likes to know or discuss things about cultivation "ex situ" of hardy Ping species, perhaps I can contribute something. My best growing results with hardy species are with P. macroceras and P. grandiflora, but I'm trying to cultivate others in small numbers as well.

    Currently I'm observing how very little changes in cultivation conditions lead to very big changes during the course of the year with P. grandiflora. I'm really cultivating the same batch of P. grandiflora only a few steps away in my garden under slightly different cultivation conditions, and some plants just are finishing the creation of their winter bulbs, while others will (most likely) stand another 6 to 8 weeks on their summer leaves, with just little variation of cultivation. I'd predict, that the "late bulb" P. grandiflora will create stronger, bigger and more divided winter bulbs and masses of gemmae in next winter compared with the "early bulb" ones, but I'll see when winter is over.

    If there is a visible difference in development of "early bulb" and "late bulb" P. grandiflora next season, I will have a bit more information about best gardening practice to cultivate and propagate P. grandiflora, and most likely this will also help me to improve my skills in Ping cultivation with other hardy Pinguicula, that I am yet growing in very few numbers only until now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jesse View Post
    Currently I'm observing how very little changes in cultivation conditions lead to very big changes during the course of the year with P. grandiflora. I'm really cultivating the same batch of P. grandiflora only a few steps away in my garden under slightly different cultivation conditions, and some plants just are finishing the creation of their winter bulbs, while others will (most likely) stand another 6 to 8 weeks on their summer leaves, with just little variation of cultivation. I'd predict, that the "late bulb" P. grandiflora will create stronger, bigger and more divided winter bulbs and masses of gemmae in next winter compared with the "early bulb" ones, but I'll see when winter is over.
    Jesse, what are you currently doing to allow extra growth in your temperate pings? Most of mine have already gone dormant, or are in the process of it, and all of them will probably have winter hibernacula in the next couple of weeks. I have them outside under normal conditions in Vancouver, BC. They get full sun from sunrise until about noon, and then bright shade. They never get warmer than 27 degrees celsius, but the humidity ranges quite a bit.

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    jeff 2's Avatar
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    suite

    JESSE you grow what grandiflora species the type ?

    because some others grandiflora exist I grow all

    grandiflora subsp grandiflora (type)
    grandiflora subsp rosea (pink)
    grandiflora subsp grandiflora f pallida ( pale blue)
    grandiflora subsp grandiflora var chionopetra( white)

    and may be a new, actualy in study , grandiflora subsp grandiflora var asturiensis

    all these one have not the same substrate .

    actually all my temperate species are in hibernaculae ( except 2-3 who do not) , most stays outdoor all year and yours ?

    jeff

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quatchi View Post
    Jesse, what are you currently doing to allow extra growth in your temperate pings? Most of mine have already gone dormant, or are in the process of it, and all of them will probably have winter hibernacula in the next couple of weeks.
    I am doing nothing special targeted to "allow extra growth", I am just a little bit "testing and observing". Testing a little variation in cultivation and observing what happens to the cultivated plants. So I can find out what are the best cultivation conditions for a given species.

    With P. grandiflora I did this testing: Potted cultivation in a pot vs. planted cultivation in a mini-bog.

    What did I use: P. grandiflora, grown from seed and kept all together until March 2011. Substrate:Peat.

    Potted cultivation: Free standing pot, half-shady, some more hours of sun as with the mini-bog plants since March 2011.

    Planted cultivation: Mini-bog dug-in and ground-even, mostly shaded and very little sun since March 2011.

    And this is my current observation of today:



    The potted plants have already created their winter bulbs or are mostly finished with it while the mini-bog plants are green and growing without any sign of bulb creation.

    Until three weeks ago there was no visible difference between the mini-bog and the potted plants (OK, perhaps the mini-bog plants were a bit darker green leaves), but all growing strong. Then the potted plants started to develop their winter bulbs and the mini-bog plants did not.

    I'm wondering what may cause the difference. In my thinking I imagine P. grandiflora in it's summer leaves as clock that ticks. And the clock is ticking quicker when the plant get more sun and heat, it is ticking slower in the shade and cooler environment. And when the internal "Pinguicula clock time display" has reaced a certain time, the plant is forming its winter bulb.

    BTW: For a comparison I did the same with P. macroceras ssp. nortensis at the same time. P. macroceras does NOT show the same results as P. grandiflora, but with P. macroceras ssp. nortensis the potted plants are in summer leaves as the mini-bog plants are also until today.

    But I'm doing further observations on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    JESSE you grow what grandiflora species the type ?
    I have received the seeds as simply P. grandiflora.
    So it should be P. grandiflora var. grandiflora, the typical ones.

    Flowers look like:


    Initially I was able to grow three plants from seed that I received from a grower, and after that those three were propagated by winter bulbs/gemmae only, so it should be three genetical different clones in my P. grandiflora stock. I imagine that I am able to distinguish my three clones by their flowers, in the picture above there are flowers of two of my P. grandiflora clones. I think the flowers look a little bit different, although they are grown from the same batch of seeds.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    grandiflora subsp grandiflora (type)
    grandiflora subsp rosea (pink)
    grandiflora subsp grandiflora f pallida ( pale blue)
    grandiflora subsp grandiflora var chionopetra( white)

    and may be a new, actualy in study , grandiflora subsp grandiflora var asturiensis

    all these one have not the same substrate .
    Please tell me more about the preferred substrate, as I like to extend my hardy Ping collection if I can obtain seeds or gemmae. Currently I cultivate P. grandiflora in cheap pure peat. Although it was declared blonde peat I think it's more a mix of blonde and black peat, and P. grandiflora is doing well (P. macroceras also).

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    actually all my temperate species are in hibernaculae ( except 2-3 who do not) , most stays outdoor all year and yours ?
    All my hardy Pinguicula are always outdoors for the whole year. So I can only cultivate the cold-temperate and hardy Pinguicula species and not the warm-temperate species from Southern USA.

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