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Thread: Cold hardy Pinguicula: winter buds and gemmae pics

  1. #25
    jeff 2's Avatar
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    Bonjour

    P.corsica is a french species , come from the island Corse , it is a bog specie like sometimes vulgaris , nevadensis .

    in this island there are in the mountain(+ or - 2400m) snow during 4 to 7 month see here the WINTER temperature link

    in FRANCE but also in ITALIE- SUISSE and SPAIN a lot of temperate ping flowered in the end of april , may before it is exceptional

    I've always had problem the winter here with macroceras ( subsp macroceras or subsp nortensis to US , it is the same just different eco type).

    I grow a lot of temperate species ( it is my speciality) and here with a lot of night with -8c and sometimes -15c no problem for instant , some will wake up already

    JEFF
    Last edited by jeff 2; 03-16-2012 at 02:21 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    P.corsica is a french species, come from the island Corse, it is a bog specie like sometimes vulgaris , nevadensis.
    So best substrate for P. corsica is "pure peat"?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    in this island there are in the mountain(+ or - 2400m) snow during 4 to 7 month see here the WINTER temperature link
    Thank you for posting that climate table! If I take a closer look to the winter temperatures, this species should also be able to grow in my climate. Perhaps I try if I can obtain a hibernacle or some gemmae.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    I've always had problem the winter here with macroceras ( subsp macroceras or subsp nortensis to US , it is the same just different eco type).
    Do you keep them in peat or in calcerous mix? I keep my macroceras in a sort of dark peat and they do fine in my winters (except potted hibernacles this winter).

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    I grow a lot of temperate species ( it is my speciality) and here with a lot of night with -8c and sometimes -15c no problem for instant , some will wake up already
    I grow just a few species. I started three years ago with them. But I am trying to increase my collection.

    Here are more pictures of two species and one hybrid. I obtained them last fall. At least they have survived this winter - potted.

    Pinguicula fiorii (my only hibernacle):


    Pinguicula longifolia var. reichenbachiana (my only hibernacle):


    Pinguicula hybrid P. grandiflora rosea x vallisneriifolia (I have a few of them):

  3. #27
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    These soil type maps of the US might be helpful. An interesting project would be to overlay the USDA maps of reported CP populations over these.

    http://www.bonap.org/2008_Soil/SoilT...latedMaps.html
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    jeff 2's Avatar
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    Bonjour

    for corsica yes 'in situ' it is a pure peat , in my cultivate for this specie also

    if you want some hibernaculae or buds for the corsica var pallidula ( the white species) in this autumn I can send some one.

    I use for macroceras( var macroceras or var nortensis ) blond peat , may be it is the problem.


    fiorii is very difficult good substrate ; longifolia subsp reichenbachiana is a calcareous species not a acid ( see the picture on my web site)

    grandiflora subsp rosea is not a acid specie like vallisneriifolia , the first is rather a calcareous clay specie , vallisneriifolia a calcareous specie for me your substrate for the hybrid is not good.

    jeff

    jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    These soil type maps of the US might be helpful. An interesting project would be to overlay the USDA maps of reported CP populations over these.

    http://www.bonap.org/2008_Soil/SoilT...latedMaps.html
    Hm. But in that case the resolution and accuracy of the maps must be the same, if you want to pull the information about natural soil type out of it. Here in Germany, for example peat bogs may be very small and I think that small peat bogs just dissapear in soil type maps. I'd rather prefer a kind of written species/soil table that shows information about what soil is best for what species.


    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    Bonjour

    for corsica yes 'in situ' it is a pure peat , in my cultivate for this specie also
    Bonjour Jeff, I keep that in mind!

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    if you want some hibernaculae or buds for the corsica var pallidula ( the white species) in this autumn I can send some one.
    I keep that in mind, too!

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    I use for macroceras( var macroceras or var nortensis ) blond peat , may be it is the problem.
    Perhaps you can mix a little bit of black peat or some kind of marshland soil into the substrate? What I purchased for my macroceras ssp. nortensis was declared to be blonde peat, but I think its more a mix of blonde and black peat. What I think about my macroceras nortensis is, that they suffer from heat and sunlight during summer, even here at 53 North. So perhaps the heat in your area makes them more suffering than the peat you use.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff 2 View Post
    fiorii is very difficult good substrate ; longifolia subsp reichenbachiana is a calcareous species not a acid ( see the picture on my web site)

    grandiflora subsp rosea is not a acid specie like vallisneriifolia , the first is rather a calcareous clay specie , vallisneriifolia a calcareous specie for me your substrate for the hybrid is not good.
    The three hibernacles I showed previously are in the same pot and substrate they were when I purchased them. I just turned the moss on the surface upside down and removed the gemmae (if available) earlier this year. I'm planning to repot them "including all the pot contents" into a mini-bog with calcerous substrate later this season. I just have to dig out some soill in my garden to dig in another mini-bog during the next months.

    And here is another one of my collection, it is my Pinguicula alpina.
    Not really a hibernacle any longer, but seems to be a very rare species in cultivation, at least the price is high to purchase one:

  6. #30
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    Bonjour

    longifolia subsp reichenbachiana like all the longifolia are not a bog species , rather a specie grown on a calcareous cliff like vallisneriifolia and a lot of others calcareous ping species.

    these longifolia and vallisneriifolia have need a long leave to catch the insecte ,in a bog I think you have not these long leaves.

    I cultivate all these species in a calcareous substrate , pot tilt to 45 to have these long leaves , and I have 20cm some time for one leave it is good no !!!

    P.alpina is a specie with a undifferentiated substrate 'in situ' .

    some times I cultivate this specie in acid substrate or in calcareous .

    the ideal for this specie is to start by seeds , and do not touch after , no repot .

    not a number:

    interessant maps , the soil with the vegetation are very important , in fact their environment.

    for a lot of US ping we know their situation example the subtropical ( see on my web site the rubric and go to "monography" , then you have specie by specie to 'habitats' the "chorologique "map.)

    jeff
    Last edited by jeff 2; 03-25-2012 at 07:23 AM.

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    Not a thread jack, but here are some flowers I have this year. Anyone else have any?


    P. macroceras ssp nortensis


    P. grandiflora ssp rosea putting up a flower


    P. corsica flowers!



    P. vulgaris

    Mauro

  8. #32
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    Nice flowers! I don't have anything flowering right now, but when i take my grandiflora out of dormancy in June, I'm certain to have lots of flowers, like previous times. Who says they can't grow indoors?

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