User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 39

Thread: Cold hardy Pinguicula: winter buds and gemmae pics

  1. #1
    jesse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Hamburg (Germany)
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cold hardy Pinguicula: winter buds and gemmae pics

    Hi,
    as I have looked through the Pinguicula forum I found, that there are hardly any pictures to find that show cold hardy Pinguicula and their gemmae buds in spring.

    Cold hardy Pinguicula can propagate from their winter buds as they produce small gemmae during autumn/winter, that can grow to individual plants the next season.

    With some species, the gemmae is buried in the soil, with some species the gemmae is developed above the soil, and in many cases it depends on climate, weather, soil and cultivation conditions whether the gemmae is above or below the soil.

    So here are some of my plants as of today that show gemmae buds above the soil:

    Pinguicula macrocereas ssp. nortensis:



    Pinguicula grandiflora:


    If the gemmae are growing above ground, heavy rain can cut them loose and toss them a bit around so they find a new place to grow. But most of the gemmae will be overgrown by the mother plant and die, when the big hibernaculum starts to develop its summer leaves.

    For best propagation results, you can dig the hibernacula out of their soil, remove the gemmae, then replant hibernaculum and gemmae seperately. If your plants set a lot of gemmae (as those you can see on the pictures above), you can multiply your stock of plants with high propagation rates each year.

    Weather here is fine currently, so now I'm going out and dig out some hibernacula and gemmae and replant them.

    The advantage of gemmae propagation against propagation by seed is:
    1. Small gemmae can grow to flowering size buds within just one season. Propagation by seeds takes much longer until you have plants flowering.
    2. Child plants are always the same as their mother plants when propagated from gemmae, no hybrids can occur as it is possible when propagated from seeds and you are cultivating different species in the same garden at the same time.

    Good luck with your cold hardy Pinguicula - whoever is keeping some!

  2. #2
    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Near Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,712
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you for your post as I did not know this. I have both these growing in my bog outside and going out shortly to check for gemmae on those.

  3. #3
    jesse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Hamburg (Germany)
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    Thank you for your post as I did not know this. I have both these growing in my bog outside and going out shortly to check for gemmae on those.
    Oh, somebody posting from Oregon, where P. macroceras ssp. nortensis has its natural habitat!

    If this thread helped someone in harvesting gemmae from the hibernacula and propagating some cold temperate Pinguicula by using the gemmae before they are overgrown by their mother plant, it was worth starting the topic.

    Did you find gemmae when checking your hibernacula?

    For harvesting the gemmae I dig out the hibernaculum and carefully scrub off the gemmae with the edge of a pocket knife. If there are a lot of roots attached to the hibernaculum, you need not care too much about it: The roots of most cold temperate Pinguicula (including P. macroceras and P. grandiflora) die during winter completely, so the big roots at this time of the year attached to the hibernacula are dead roots. But be carefully, as soon as the winter buds start unfolding, new roots are growing. This afternoon in my climate I found several buds to have already a few new grown roots, just some millimetres long (and not very many of them). In contrast to the long, dead, old roots the new grown roots should be taken good care of, so that they don't break.

    Perhaps I can take another picture the next days and show long, old, dead roots from last season and short, new grown roots from this season on a hibernaculum at the same time.

  4. #4
    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Near Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,712
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Okay, took some pics. I don't see any gemmae, but maybe under the soil or not forming any? What do you think?
    The P. grandiflora shrinks quite a bit every winter, but grows quite large in summer. The P. macroceras I just got last year. The mystery one popped up in the old bog I had Primuliflora, grandiflora, and another kind I do not remember the name of after they all perished from being too wet, and this one popped up unexpected one day last summer and I moved it to the new bog. In the new bog, they are mounded with better-draining soil under them.

    This one I am not sure which kind it is, probably have to wait until it flowers
    [IMG][/IMG]

    This is the P. grandiflora
    [IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

    This is the P. macroceras that looks like it has plantlets forming at the side
    [IMG][/IMG]

  5. #5
    jesse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Hamburg (Germany)
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    Okay, took some pics. I don't see any gemmae, but maybe under the soil or not forming any? What do you think?
    Maybe.
    You never know what sits at the base of a bud until you checked the base of a bud down to the point where the roots are connected. The gemmae may develop below the surface and sit there - undetected until overgrown by the mother plant and dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    This one I am not sure which kind it is, probably have to wait until it flowers
    If the only decision to make is between P. macroceras and P. grandiflora, I would say that it is P. macroceras. But the flower will show you for sure.


    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    This is the P. macroceras that looks like it has plantlets forming at the side
    Oh yes, there are even plantlets visible and there should be several more small gemmae. That one looks like it is latest time for harvesting the plantlets and gemmae and planting everything seperately. If plantlets or gemma are big enough to decide which side is up or down, just plant as normal, half-way into the ground. With smaller gemmae, the rounded side is down, the pointed or serrated side is up. With very small gemmae you cannot decide up or down, just sow them as you would do with seeds: Put on the ground and press on slightly. Other than with seeds, the "germination rate" of even small gemmae is 100% when kept moist.

    My P. macroceras ssp. nortensis and P. grandiflora are growing in mini-bogs, filled with pure peat. Small gemmae I sometimes put into pots initially, which allows better handling at the kitchen table.

  6. #6
    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Near Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,712
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you. I think I will leave them alone this year and check for gemmae earlier next year. I think taking some of the moss away from the base might make it easier to see what is happening and, who knows, maybe some may pop up in the moss close the the plants that I cannot see right now. I really hate to chance losing the plants by digging them up right now. I do hope to get more cold-hardy ping varieties into the bog this year.

  7. #7
    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    2,075
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I thought I had lost all my P. grandiflora last fall. But a few weeks ago I was out cleaning/weeding in the bog, and i found one medium-ish dormant bud. It is now in a better location, out from under the plants that shaded it last year, and has 3-4 leaves already.


    I, too, look forward to trying new species this year.
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
    My WWWs

  8. #8
    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Near Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,712
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had one come back like that in a pot. I thought it was dead and so put the pot under the table and forgot about it, let it dry out. I then moved the table and it got rained on and came back I am guessing from the roots.

    I plant mine in the bog next to sarrs so that they get full morning sun and dappled sun in the afternoon. The grandiflora though seems to tolerate much more sun that the others, and may even do better with more sun.

    I would love to see a bunch of pings and their little flowers all over the bog someday.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •