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Thread: Good starter butterwort?

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    kwende's Avatar
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    Good starter butterwort?

    Come spring I'd like to start collecting a couple butterworts.

    I have a really nice, sprawling collection of Sundews, Nepenthes, VFTs, Sarrs and even bladderworts. Pings are my last unexplored territory (completely unexplored). I was wondering if anybody could recommend some good, starter butterworts with similar requirements to, say, D. Capensis or D. Natalensis or D. Alicea (the "weeds" of the sundew world). Preferably one that does well under high lighting T8s, 75-80 degrees, usually around 40-60% humidity.

    HOWEVER. I had one Ping a long, long time ago that didn't fare well. I have gorgeous, red, slimy sundews in my terrarium; but I worry the lighting may be too high for butterworts. The leaves appeared to burn and the plant eventually just died. I had it on the tray method (so maybe root rot?)

    Typically I tend to overthink things ... I know, but I'm hoping someone can point me in a good direction. Thanks!

    ...I forgot to mention. One more thing is I'd prefer to not have to think about dormancy.

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    Mexican Pings can take a lot of light. They come from completely open areas with very harsh conditions. Their dormancy is surprisingly easy. In your area you could simply sit them in a windowsill and forget about them for the winter. The easy species would be moranensis, esseriana, launeana, and cyclosecta.

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    kwende's Avatar
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    By forgetting about them, we're still talking about watering them every so often, though, right?

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    JMN16150's Avatar
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    Mexican Pings can take a lot of light. They come from completely open areas with very harsh conditions. Their dormancy is surprisingly easy. In your area you could simply sit them in a windowsill and forget about them for the winter. The easy species would be moranensis, esseriana, launeana, and cyclosecta.
    Agreed
    By forgetting about them, we're still talking about watering them every so often, though, right?
    During dormancy, no... They go into a succulent-like state and lives like a succulent until the dormancy is over

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    I haven't watered mine since November.

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    Tastes like chicken! Exo's Avatar
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    Yeah, Mexican pings are the easiest IMO, P x sethos being the easiest I've ever grown..I've never seen such a vigorous ping.
    Some days it just isn't worth chewing thru the restraints.

    My growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...255#post961255

    Video of my birth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Xc5wIpUenQ

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    J NewspaperFort's Avatar
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    m p. x sethos is my most demanding ping. i would try any form of moranensis as they all seem to flower almost constantly.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wire Man View Post
    Mexican Pings can take a lot of light. They come from completely open areas with very harsh conditions. Their dormancy is surprisingly easy. In your area you could simply sit them in a windowsill and forget about them for the winter. The easy species would be moranensis, esseriana, launeana, and cyclosecta.
    What he said. I find that the crosses are the easiest to maintain.

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