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Thread: Pinguicula Possibilities

  1. #9
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Nice looking little plantlets. I'm sure anxious to see them mature and bloom - hopefully they will exhibit traits other than simply P. planifolia, but even if they turn out to be just P. planifolia, even that would be a very nice thing.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Formerly pond boy Ngantnier's Avatar
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    This is exciting, definately keep us updated! This doesn't seem that far fetched either. They said the Ancephya and Brachyceras subgenera of Nymphaea couldn't be hybridized, then William Philips crossed the two and proved everyone wrong (DNA testing was even done for verification). I wonder if the offspring will be fertile if they prove to be hybrids? Would be great if they were, imagine the possibilities of adding such a distantly related plant's genetics to the gene pool!

    I'm curious if some of the seedlings are pure planifolia and some are hybrids? Or is it typical for seedlings of planifolia to show so much variation in form and color? It seems that there are some seedlings that look like typical planifolia, while others are greener with more obtuse leaf ends. Interesting to say the least... Is there any way you can get us a higher resolution image of the plants? Perhaps a macro shot of a few examples of the seedlings?

    Joseph are Pinguicula flowers typically self-sterile, or is that just a trait of P.'Sethos'?
    Last edited by Ngantnier; 11-10-2014 at 09:08 PM.

  3. #11
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Many of the Mexican/equitorial Pinguicula can be selfed, somewhat easily crossed with many other related species or hybrids, and like P. pumila, and P. lusitanica, some of the smallest and least common to cultivation species of Mexican/equitorial Pinguicula are self-fertile and automatically self-pollinating, similar to those two. I haven't heard of any other attempts to produce an F2 generation of P. 'Sethos', other than my own. I plan to attempt a repeat of my P. 'Sethos' selfing, as soon as practical, since it was such a rewarding experience and I'm interested in seeing what happens. With P. planifolia, I once had a seedpod produced by self-pollination that was inadvertently broken from the plant, before the seed had finished ripening. Not to let it go to waste, I carefully opened the pod to reveal partially developed seed, that was literally green in color. I planted them as if they were normal seed. They promptly germinated and grew into normal plants.

    Some plants have the ability to produce seed with embryos that are simply clones of the mother plant, the stimulus of being pollinated with closely related pollen, or sometimes basically anything (though that pollen doesn't actually fertilize the ovules of the mother plant).
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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