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Thread: Ping Troubleshooting

  1. #9
    Sidgrowspings's Avatar
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    After reading a bit more about Pings from you guys' recommended websites, and reading glowing remarks about these all mineral mixes containing , , and I may give that a try for my P. cyclosecta. I'll conduct an experiment today to see how that mix absorbs water. I'll try and start a new thread about it.

  2. #10
    w03's Avatar
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    A really easy base material for mineral mixes is APS/Turface. It's (relatively) readily available, doesn't degrade, and holds water well.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

  3. #11
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Thanks for the additional cultural details.


    BTW, none of the media ingredients I use or recommend are anything other than 100% mineral, other than those I suggest as amendments to the media, such as dilute fertilizer solutions, dried insect powder, or Trichoderma harzianum inoculant.


    My favorite media are all-mineral ingredients:
    Media: 1 part Schultz aquatic plant soil (sintered fullers earth) and 1 part 20 or 30 grit silica sand --- pre-moisten the sand (not wet, just damp) and blend a very small amount of iron oxide powder into the sand before mixing all ingredients together, I mix this media thoroughly while lightly spraying with a 40ppm solution of 20-20-20 soluble fertilizer with trace elements (which is absorbed/adsorbed by the aquatic plant soil and fortifies it).
    Amendments to media: dried, powdered, insects with a small amount of Trichoderma harzianum inoculum mixed in.

    After reading the additional details of your cultural conditions, it seems to me that the missing factor is most definitely a lack of nutrients. Yes, successfully fertilizing Pinguicula can be tricky and, if done improperly, can cause the loss of the plant, but the same can happen if essential nutrition is withheld, it just may linger a little longer.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #12
    Sidgrowspings's Avatar
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    Thank you, everybody! This is great information. I did order Turface, and I used Joseph Clemen's recipe for a 100% mineral soil mix of sand, turface, and a very small amount of Fe2O3. Fortunately I do have a bottle of pure, ceramic glaze grade oxide lying around, so I using a dentist's spatula, I mixed a VERY small amount of it into the sand/turface, and carefully transplanted both Pings into the new stuff. After reading posts about people's pings turn-arounds after using mineral based media, I am sure this will help my pings develop better roots. I tested the sand/turface and pure turface out before transplanting. I am amazed at how well even pure turface wicks up water, but I decided to stick with the sand-turface mixture.

    I will also try getting some freeze-dried bloodworms. Conveniently there is a pet store right next to my gym, so I can get some and try them out today. There are some trace amounts of fertilizer in the water I use as well, but its extremely diluted. Its basically what ever residual fertilizer is washed off my orchids when I soak them in a tub of collected rainwater.

  5. #13
    Sidgrowspings's Avatar
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    So here's the status of my Pings. I've kept them in the same location, and transplanted them into a mineral mix described by Joseph Clemens- 1:1 horticultural sand / turface, with a small amount of iron. I also bought freeze-dried bloodworms, and crumbling one or two up I sprinkled them over the pings.

    Here's what P. cyclosecta look like now, its rosette is domed out, so it looks a little more healthy, but it still seems to be growing succulent leaves:

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Here's what P. koehres looks like now, I am relieved to see it growing lots of new leaves:



    I'm sure that in another week the rosette of P. kohres will be filled out. The P. cyclosecta still concerns me though, it still hasn't grown much roots. I'll keep watering it and hope that the increasing temperatures and humidity will make a difference. I could also try pulling succulent leaves off the bottom of the rosette and see if they "strike".

  6. #14
    cwatson1414's Avatar
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    My P. cyclosecta rooted well in response to drying out. It looks good. I wouldn't worry.

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