User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Pings arrived dormant

  1. #1
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,435
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've got Pinguicula cyclosecta, P. agnata, P. laueana and P. ehlersiae.

    Bright light or low light?

    Peat/sand mix?

    Overhead watering or tray method?

    Thanks! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]



    Cindy

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Quebec city, Qc, Canada
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Cindy,

    I would use 1/4 of each: sand, peat, vermiculite, perlite. This is what I used for all my mexican pings. They all do great, except P.agnata, which I suspect to require less watering. If they are dormant, I would go for a lightly moist substrate that you will let dry during the winter. I don't know if you can use dry substrate right away, I'm always paranoid about letting the plants drying out, even if the pings can hold this very well.

    Overhead watering and strong light are perfect, but try to do not drop water on the foliage when you water them.

  3. #3
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,539
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Uh, none of the above mentioned Pinguicula have a dormancy. They are tropical heterophyllous Pinguicula. Under healthy growing conditions, they never stop growing.

    A good place to find out more about these fascinating tropical CP is CP Database Pinguicula Article.

    What you may mean is that they are in their "winter" leaf form and not their "summer" leaf form of growth, hence the group name: tropical heterophyllous (more than one kind of leaf).

    Some of the tropical Mexican Pinguicula do have a sort of dormancy, though I question even this. I am referring to the ones like P. heterophylla or P. acuminata both of which are not visible above the media when they are in their "winter" leaf form. I question "dormancy" because they are known to flower in this form, sending up their flowers from the underground, leafless, "dormant" plant. Not quite true dormant behavior.

    Dormancy = state of the plant when growth has ceased for the year.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    494
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Ping Man for the information. Cindy and I were wondering to try to keep them pings in their winter leaf stage or try to get them growing again. As you might know, we are from a hot and humid region and fear that the plants may not do well.

  5. #5
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    2,539
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up

    As you know I live in a "HOT", but dry climate -- most of the year, that is. Right now it is somewhat cooler and moister -- though the moister is not that common even this time of year.

    None of that matters where I grow my Pings right now. They are indoors (climate controlled) under fluorescent lights. I run the lights on timers (15 hours per day). Since it is predominantly "Hot" outside, and especially so in the daytime, I set my lights to turn on at 6 p.m. (1800) and to go off at 9 a.m. (0900). This is to prevent overtaxing my compressor-driven home air-conditioning system, which would prevent it from keeping the temperature in the plant room below 90F at all times. The actual temperatures experienced by the plants are (85F high during their day, 75F low during their night). I had observed that most of the heterophyllous Pings have been switching between "summer" and "winter" leaf form at various times (many of the same species/clones would be in either form at any given time). I have not been able to "control" this behavior despite various attempts at doing so. I had been growing them in 100% Sphagnum peat moss, but recently have been testing various calcareous media on those Pings that can appreciate it, in order to improve my growing technique.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •