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Thread: Eight Flowers On P. primuliflora

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    The plant I purchased in September from good old Home Depot produced many plantlets in October and began flowering in November. The eighth flower scape has now surfaced. When does it stop? Also, since these flowers come up ~two weeks apart they don't bloom at the same time. Can I assume that there are no seeds?

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    Hmm, I think you can refrigerate pollen for a few weeks, you could try that... but it's faster to get more plants via leaf cuttings.
    A flytrap ate my homework!
    -Michelle

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Is this plant the type to "self." I agree, leaf cuttings and certainly plantlets are the way to go.

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    These produce viable seed readily from self-pollinated flowers. Just carefully remove the pollen from beneath the stigma flap and place it on the upper surface of the same, then wait about 2-3 weeks. The seed pod will split open when ripe to reveal the small dark brown seed. Sow them promptly and they should germinate readily into many small genetically distinct individuals.

    ---------------
    Below is an excellent sketch of the Pinguicula flower structure found at the CP Database website:

    From the CP Database "Slideshow of Pinguicula"
    http://www.omnisterra.com/botany/cp/...ings/pings.htm



    Basically you have the ovary. At the end of the ovary and mostly blocking the opening of the flower is the stigma (this is a flap that is connected at the end of the ovary and it covers the two stamens), filaments with attached anthers are hidden underneath the stigma. The upper surface of the stigma is where pollen is received to accomplish pollination, while the underside of this stigma cover is where the plant keeps its own pollen. This reduces the chance that pollen from this same plant will reach the upper surface of the stigma and self-pollinate the flower.

    When pollinating Pinguicula extra caution must be used because the connection of the stigma to the ovary is very tenuous and fragile while the stamens are more substantial and firmly attached to the base of the ovary.

    Frequently pollen is released and accumulates under the covering stigma, which can then be collected with a flat toothpick and gently placed on top of the stigma surface to effect pollination.

    I myself have found it easier to first photograph the flowers for posterity and then to carefully remove most of the petals to make it easier to access the reproductive parts of the flower without damaging them.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thank You!!! That ilustration is VERY useful.

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    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hi Joseph, O King of Propagation [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    I have a question. You stated:

    "The upper surface of the stigma is where pollen is received to accomplish pollination, while the underside of this stigma cover is where the plant keeps its own pollen. This reduces the chance that pollen from this same plant will reach the upper surface of the stigma and self-pollinate the flower."

    And also:

    "Just carefully remove the pollen from beneath the stigma flap and place it on the upper surface of the same, then wait about 2-3 weeks."

    So I was wondering...if the stigma shelters the anther to reduce self-pollination...then why would one take the pollen and put it on the upper surface to self pollinate? Would it be better to pollinate a P. prim with a different flower (pollen) than with itself? What is the reason its natural structure tries to prevent the flower from being self pollinated? To achieve a better mix of genetic material for a stronger plant?

    'Scuse my ignorance but pollination and genetics were a loooooooooooooooooong time ago for me. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/img]

    Suzanne
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    Oh oh! I bet if you brought it to my house it would stop. Pings hate me.
    There is no item greater in value than life, for without life value would cease to exist.
    My Grow List

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    Thank you kindly for the info and the wonderful diagram. My P. primuliflora has been flowering non-stop now for about three seasons. Just about every time I try to pollinate either I get no pollen for some odd reason, or I end up knocking most of the flower off of the plant. Really fragile little things.
    Lithops care info: If you take care of it, it will die.

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