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Thread: Species, hybrids, and cultivars

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Species -- classified by taxonomists from populations of wild plants.

    Hybrids -- crosses with other species or hybrids (mixing of genetic material between species and/or other hybrids).

    Cultivars (Cultivated Varieties) -- selections by humans from species and/or hybrids (see above).

    I have heard talk of destroying seed produced by cultivars *[IMG]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/IMG]

    As long as proper notation is used to refer to plants produced this way -- I see benefit rather than any harm. Only possible negative impact I can see would be not to keep track of the true status of these plants and to intentionally or mistakenly give them their parent's name; i.e. You self pollinate Pinguicula 'Sethos' and then label all the F2 progeny as if they were the same as their parent, Pinguicula 'Sethos'. This would, in most cases, be inaccurate -- to say the least. See photo of population of Pinguicula 'Sethos' x self seedlings below:



    As can be seen, these plants are apparently doing what they would be expected to do --- they are segregating. In other words: the genes they inherited from their grandparents are being reorganized into different patterns, producing unique individuals. Some of these individuals may deserve cultivar status of their own. . . but if I had destroyed the seed produced by their parent, then, sad to say . . . they would not even exist.

    This is a very normal process for subsequent generations of plants from hybrid origins, that they swing back and forth between the characteristics of the original hybrid parents, until, sometime in the future, conceivably they could stabilize into various populations of plants with similar characteristics, i.e. artificial species. Don't forget to consider some of the possible complications this process may include: self-pollination, crossing back to one or the other original species, crossing between other survivors of the various generations that may bloom at the same time and that have compatible pollen. I believe this is where the term "hybrid swarm" comes from.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 01-21-2007 at 12:07 AM. Reason: Correction of Photo URL
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Very interesting P-man, so do you plan to take them through to the fourth gen.
    from what i have read (limited) this is supposed to be where you start to see stabilization?
    Peace

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    O:-) trashcan's Avatar
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    Thank you for informative post. What is the proper way to write out named Nepenthes hybrids (not sure if they are cultivars or not), like N. x Judith Finn, or N. x wrigelyana. Should there be quotes, italics?

    Thank you,
    Pat

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Following is an excerpt from the CP Database -- Judith Finn. Red text highlights the current status of this cultivar as preliminary - there has been no "standard" published so the registration of this cultivar name is not complete, however if it were it could be correctly written several different ways, but not with an "X". My favorite way is Nepenthes 'Judith Finn'.
    -------------------------
    N: $[Nepenthes ' Judith Finn ' {D'Amato}]
    P: Savage Garden:275 (1998)
    S: =[[Nepenthes spathulata {Danser}] * [Nepenthes veitchii {Hook.f.}]]
    HC: registration preliminary (standard missing)
    B: M.Baumgartl, Marie's Orchids, Ca., USA
    Nominant: P.D'Amato
    Description: Savage Garden:275 (1998)
    "this is a breathtaking hybrid of [[Nepenthes spathulata {Danser}] * [Nepenthes veitchii {Hook.f.}]], both famouf for their wildly flared peristomes."
    Standard:
    Etymology: after the assistant manager of Berkeley Botanical Gardens
    ---------------------
    Also check out this earlier thread:
    Earlier thread about nomenclature
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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