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Thread: Pinguicula 'John Rizzi'

  1. #9

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    I have my mexican pings in 2/1 peat sand or in pure peat...........and they are thriving! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
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    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

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    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Starman @ Aug. 24 2004,6:00)]I have my mexican pings in 2/1 peat sand or in pure peat...........and they are thriving! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    really, even your laueana? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Why not, I grow all of my Mexican Pinguicula in 100% granulated peat moss, kept "WET", year-'round and I have no problems with them rotting, even Pinguicula gypsicola and Pinguicula laueana.

    I am also a strong believer in propagation (very few of my Pinguicula are represented in my culture by only one specimen). So, presently many plants of each type are now growing in a variety of media besides peat moss.

    Light is the answer. . . Pinguicula, especially Mexican species and hybrids definitely exhibit a different phenotype when grown with abundant light. With somewhat less light I have whitnessed gorgeous plants quickly revert to all-green, insipid forms --- though with abundand flowers (Perhaps a last ditch effort to reproduce due to non-optimal environmental conditions?).
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #12

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    Hmm, my laueana rotted away from too much water, and it wasnt really wet. I think its because yours are in a terrarium. Seriously though, Im VERY surprised the gypsicola didnt rot, somebodys rotted away, and it was damp, not wet.
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
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  5. #13
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Don't ya think that if "water" were the culprit so many growers, even experienced growers, make it out to be, that I might have noticed it causing "rot" problems with my Mexican Pinguicula? I've grown and propagated literally thousands of Mexican Pinguicula over more than 6 years now. No rot from being too wet. Maybe rot is caused by being too wet and too dark, or just too darn dark (period). I cannot say that I have not lost a single plant, but I can honestly say I can count on the fingers of one hand, those I have lost. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Perhaps, before we go blaming "water" for Pinguicula rot, we might want to examine other environmental factors that could play a part in the Wet = Rot hypothesis.

    I can't imagine that they grow where it is all that "dark". After all their homeland is in the mountains of southern Mexico. Even on north slopes there must be quite a degree of incidental light. And, air movement, and drainage, perhaps there is a bit of both to explain why they grow where they do.

    No terraria, never had any terraria. Just shallow plastic trays.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Is it because you live in a deset, thats where mexican pings usually grow so that much water doesnt bother them in that climate. But I do know if they are kept wet here they rot away! And Im speking from experience, and from what I have heard from other ppl(P.gypsicola rotted away on an expert)
    So I think its to do with the climate. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Dino [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]
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    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

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    I grow my Jizza, and others, in 2/1/1 peat, sand, perlite and unless I cook them in a serious heatwave (never again are they to be left unattended) they do very well.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  8. #16
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    --------------- ----------------
    My growing conditions (no desert in the grow room):
    --------------- ---------------
    - I grow mine in a wide variety of media.

    - They are in a room inside a building that is air-conditioned with refrigerated air. They have no idea that there is a "desert" outside. They do not feel the desert air, they do not see the desert sun, and the desert animals do not munch on them or use them to line their nests.

    - I provide supplemental humidification using purified water delivered as an ultrasonic mist that is dispersed by a small electric fan.

    - I provide constantly moving air by using a high-velocity auto-pivoting fan.

    - I keep the plants in shallow plastic trays.

    - I maintain about 1/2 - 3/4 inch of water in the trays at nearly all times. (Every once in awhile the trays dry out, but the pots never get dry.)

    - Most are potted in 2 inch square plastic pots. As many as 18 can be squeezed together in each tray.

    - Most are kept within 2-3 inches of multiple 40 watt, 4 foot, cool white fluorescent lamps - about 4-8 per shelf. The lights are on timers for 15 hours per day. Figuring the day length at the latitudes Mexican Pinguicula grow in the wild their day length varies just a little from season to season - - - I chose 15 hours because it is a little longer than the longest day they would experience in nature, and to give them a little more light. Curious, this does not ensure summer leaf form.

    Fernando, if you read this please let me know if you took any light measurements of the plants natural habitats.

    ------------------------------



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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