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Thread: Question for pinguiculaman

  1. #1

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    Please take a moment to explain to me your growing medium choice of-
    "100% granular peat moss with a vertical layer of pumice through the center of the pot"

    Question for anyone, Why use bloodworms? Are they necessary?

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Actually Laura, though I still use 100% granular peat moss for some of my CP, including Pinguicula, I have begun to use a larger proportion of other media mixtures as well. I still use the vertical layer of pumice, about 1/4 inch thick through a horizontal plane of the pot, from one side to the other and from on top of a 1/4 inch layer of redwood bark or LFS, which I place on the bottom of the pot to restrict washing of the media from the pot. This pumice layer extends up to the top of the main media being used, whatever that media may be for that particular plant. I often sprinkle just enough media on top of the pumice layer to hide it from view and I submerge the pot until the media is saturated and then tap the pot on a firm surface or the palm of my other hand to firmly settle the contents just prior to planting the pot.

    I have devised this pumice layer technique because I believe that lack of aeration to the center of the pot where the plants roots are expected to grow and thrive is common under cultivation and has dire consequences to our precious beauties. This layer is intended to help restore oxygen to the media in the center of the pot.

    I use pumice -vs- perlite because pumice does not easily crush to dust and it does not float as readily as perlite does (once it has been thoroughly wetted it sinks). Both being reduced to dust and floating away or (floating out of the mix that it is incorporated in) have been traits of perlite that personally offend my sensibilities and ideals as to how a good media ingredient should behave.

    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

    Freeze-dried bloodworms pulverized to a powder and sprinkled lightly on the leaves of Drosera and Pinguicula at regular intervals I find to be greatly beneficial. This only works well if all other environmental conditions are near optimum, especially light and moisture. If light intensity or duration is lacking this could backfire and cause some rot damage to the plants leaves. Of course, if the plants are in conditions that provide them with fair amounts of natural insect prey, then bloodworms or other supplemental feeding may be superfluous.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Thank you,

    I may be new to CPs but I am not all that new to gardening. It has been my experience that perlite does float and compress over time so I have been stearing clear of it. Pumice on the other hand looks ideal. One problem, we don't have any around here. A few art stores used to carry it and I believe at one time it was an additive in soaps so one would think it would be readily available yet it isn't. All I've got around here that is out there in quantity is that reddish volcanic rock that comes in big chunks for landscaping use and that stuff is nasty. Is it possible that I have been calling around asking for just plain gray pumice when it is actually being called something else?

    Do you get yours online somewhere? I am not all that concerned about the price but more so with being able to get my hands on a bag to use for one or two pots for myself with a little left over to set aside in the event I need it again.

    Thanks for the explanation on the freeze dried blood worms. I am thinking that I won't have any plants that would be big enough to benefit from supplemental feedings for quite a while. I currently have only a few hardy Sarracenias outside in a small bog and one little injured Drosera by my kitchen sink.

    I don't have any pings but someone has offered me a ping as well as an Utric and I additionally have been looking them up here and there and have found I like the looks of them very much. Such beefy/stocky looking plants yet they produce an orchid/violet type fragile flower. Neat.

    I have been reading they like bright indirect light yet on the flip side of the coin, I have read of people growing them in full sun to part sun. Confusing.

    Please share with me what you know about meeting the needs of P. primuliflora.

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    I've been wondering where to get pumice as well.

    Glenn

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    I am not sure if there is a Universal solution for all on where to get pumice. I can't get it in Nebraska. It seems to be common on the West Coast.
    Joseph, do you think lava pebbles would work for your technique, instead of pumice?

    Cheers,

    Joe

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    When I talked with Ivan Snyder, he said that Leo Song recommended not use pumice as Nepenthes has died from it. Not taking this too seriously, some time later a LACPS member had a beautiful Drosophyllum that grew quite large and brought it to a meeting. Then for some reason, the plant started to decline and eventually died. The grower dug out the plant and noticed that the main root went straight into a piece of pumice and that caused it to die.

    The probablity of this happening is very slim and most Pinguicula that I know don't have deep roots. I still prefer pumice over perlite, but I mention this as food for thought.

  7. #7
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Ill take the P. primuliflora question: I bought one in August of 2003. It has been soloely a window sill plant. I have done afew things like repot and move to different sill, but my basic approach is to have it at a window sill that isn't in direct sun. It sits open tray and I fill the container once a week, so it sees varying water levels. Its media is a mix of sand and peat, topdressed with LFS. It alternates and overlaps flowering and plantlet production, continuously. It looked haggard a year ago after producing 8 consecutive flowers, while producing plantlets. Other than that, it has been a model plant. That isn't the only successful approach out there, but it has been for me.

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    I've been looking up information on pings and the P. primuliflora is the one I think I would like to try first. I have a nice big bright bathroom with high humidity that I would like to try as a growing location. If it works, I will try another... and then if that one works... I will try another...

    I still don't know exactly what I want to use as a soil mix. Seems to me the temperate pings are more forgiving than the Mexican pings when it comes to soil mixes. I'm thinking the mix described by PinguiculaMan may be more appropriate for use with tropicals while the mix described by Jim would be more appropriate for species such as the P. villosa or P. vulgaris.

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