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Thread: Transplantation

  1. #9

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    I'd transplant it.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  2. #10
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I'd give it enough light so the leaves turn pink. Large green leaves on a plant that gets pink in strong light can indicate a desperate attempt to gather more light by producing larger, softer leaves which are usually more prone to insect attack or infection.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    *goes back to have a look* .... you think it's lacking light? But wouldn't that slow down growth a lot?
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

    My Growlist

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Plant + Light = Growth and Life or Plant - Light = Death, no Growth

    Most pathogenic or adventitious fungi/bacteria are inhibited by exposure to UV light.

    Even carnivorous plants use light to create carbohydrate (sugar), this provides the energy they need to grow -versus- less or no light and they will grow less or not at all.

    There is a principle of horticulture called, "limiting factors". Plants need; light, water, mineral nutrients, carbon dioxide and oxygen (delivered by moving air), correct temperature range: day/night, physical support. These must all be supplied in the proper balance for optimum growth and health. If any factors change, others would need to be changed accordingly, not necessarily for optimum growth, but for optimum health. With plants - bigger is not always better.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  5. #13

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    So, since my ping is growing well and fast, I should assume he's healthy? Since plant - light = no growth.
    If the dragon is bigger than his treasure, it's not worth the effort.

    My Growlist

  6. #14
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    From what I have observed about CP's, is that green is good, but pink on Mexican pings and red on Droseras is the best. Green means good light. Red means great light.

  7. #15
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    As jimscott has said, and I paraphrase: if a plant's genotype (genetics) would provide for it to be pink then if we grow it under optimum conditions it will display its pink phenotype (genetics combined with environment). Big, soft, and green can indicate that its genotype is geared to be big, soft, and green, or it could mean that it isn't getting enough PAR or other environmental factors to display its optimum phenotype. It is quite suitable, even sometimes desirable, and often unavoidable to grow plants, even CP under less than optimum conditions. I know, I've done it regularly and continue to do so. I would prefer to always grow everything in 100% ideal conditions, but reality often interferes.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (PinguiculaMan @ Jan. 25 2005,12:53)]Plant + Light = Growth and Life or Plant - Light = Death, no Growth

    Most pathogenic or adventitious fungi/bacteria are inhibited by exposure to UV light.

    Even carnivorous plants use light to create carbohydrate (sugar), this provides the energy they need to grow -versus- less or no light and they will grow less or not at all.

    There is a principle of horticulture called, "limiting factors". Plants need; light, water, mineral nutrients, carbon dioxide and oxygen (delivered by moving air), correct temperature range: day/night, physical support. These must all be supplied in the proper balance for optimum growth and health. If any factors change, others would need to be changed accordingly, not necessarily for optimum growth, but for optimum health. With plants - bigger is not always better.
    This a brilliant formula, Joseph! Have you thought about publishing it? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    The only person I have heard strongly suggest wide pots(and the shallow roots of pings have nothing to do with the width, it would be the depth, right?) is Phil Faulasi, especially with his P. gigantea. He thinks the extra humidity from growing them directly in a tray gives his that huge size. I hope I am remembering this right.
    Also, did the leaves in this photo look dry, or was that just me?

    Cheers,

    Joe

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