User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 13

Thread: Emergency transplant of P. moranensis

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    168
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am relatively new to carnivorous plants and several weeks ago purchased a small pot of Pinguicula moranensis to play around with and see if they could help with a fungus gnat problem I have been struggling with lately. However, I fear I may have done something horrible to them!

    These particular P. moranensis were growing in straight, sopping wet, 85% broken down, stinky, stagnant LFS that had obviously seen better days. No matter what I did to this mix nor how carefully I watered it would not even begin to dry out. The plants themselves were showing signs of decline--rotting older foliage and loss of vigor--so I took pity on them (or so I thought) and repotted them into a much lighter, airier mix of sphagnum peat moss, sand, vermiculite, perlite and pumice (1:1:1:1:1 ratio) per "The Savage Garden."

    Of course with the original growing medium this far gone, I had to remove as much as possible. I was shocked to discover that what roots my precious P. moranensis had were maybe 1/2" long at most and that the healthy inner leaves, after removing the decaying outer foliage, seemed to want to break away with even the lightest touch.

    So I repotted them into fresher mix as gently as I could and I took the healthy leaves that broke away and placed them right-side-up on top of barely damp vermiculite in a shallow, covered seed tray in hopes that they may root and send up babies.

    All of the leaves produced by these plants up to the point of repotting were large, slippery and carnivorous. They were showing no signs of producing a winter rosette. (Although now I wonder if the loss of vigor I was seeing was the initial steps of rosette formation rather than problems related to the rotting sphagnum...? But so late in the year...?)

    Everything I have read *after* repotting them says that they should be repotted only during the winter rosette stage right before the start of the non-succulent summer growth. Oops. And nobody mentions what may happen if they are repotted at any other time.

    I now have the pot back in its western windowsill with 50-60% humidity and a fairly steady temperature of 70F.

    Have I done the right thing? Or should I have just waited and not taken the chance of sending them into shock, or even worse, death? What can I do to help them along at this point?

    Please help me. I really, really like these beautiful plants and, all fungus gnat problems beside the point, I hope to have them in my collection for quite a long time.

    I apologize for the long post.

    Thanks,
    Corey

  2. #2
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Corey,
    First off, relax, you're doing the right thing. You will probably end up with more pings than you know what to do with.

    Pinguicula normally have small roots, and my experience is that they don't mind transplanting. Just sit tight, keep providing them good water and light, and good things are going to happen!

    Oh, and welcome to the forums!!!

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  3. #3
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    alot of times, in nature and in culture IME, they can and will push themselves out of the media with their old leaves that curl down, and they miniscule roots grow in the shelter of their "leaf-tent" the leaves pop off easily as a survival strategy.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes you did the right thing. For the leaves, well thats just how pings are. You will shortly have more then you could ever want.

  5. #5
    homer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Puyallup, Washington USA
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Everything I have read *after* repotting them says that they should be repotted only during the winter rosette stage right before the start of the non-succulent summer growth.
    I've transplanted my P. moranensis several times over the years, regardless of the time of year. Once in July 2000, during our hottest time of year, I decapitated mine while moving. Oops. Needless to say the plant had shallow roots, but the "shock" didn't slow down the plants growth at all. These are tough pings.

    -Homer




  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes sometimes my plant's roots die because they get knocked off in transplanting. Don't worry because a rossette of leaves always forms before roots (when taking leaf cuttings).

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    168
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is great news, everyone! I am relieved to hear that other people have had success transplanting Pinguicula moranensis "out of season." My own plants, two days after repotting them, seem none the worse for the wear, although their growth is at a standstill. I am keeping my fingers crossed that everything will turn out okay...

    Thanks again,
    Corey

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As a general rule,and suggested earlier, plants that don't have terribly developed root systems, like Mexican Pings & D. spatulata, are very easy to transplant. They are rarely upset. In contrast, the ones that DO have developed root systems, like Byblis liniflora or pigmy sundews, are highly sensitive to having their roots disturbed. They show their displeasure by dying. Spoiled sports!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •