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Thread: Foliar feeding

  1. #9

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    Oh, I never thought of freeze dried blood worms that were pulverized and sprinkled over the leaves being a fertilizer in the traditional sense of the word. I do that. I bought our bloodworms at PetSmart.

  2. #10

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    In my opinion Pinguicula are the genus of carnivorous plants that is most open to being foliar fed. Think about it - their leaves are designed to eat whatever falls on them. I don't think the plants know or care wether the nutrients come in the form of a bug or not. I've foliar fed most of my plants with miracid before, and have always noticed good results. I used to put little crystals of miracid on the leaves of some pings, in fact, and while it burned holes in the leaves, the plants loved it.

    I'm also thinking that many pings like nutrients in their soil too. I've heard of other people using pottings soil for their mexican pings and I'm now trying it myself. After about a week, the pings I stuck in potting soil are at least as happy as the ones in peat/perlite/sand.

    I know that bog plants don't like a lot of nutrients, but we don't know that all carnivorous plants are allergic to nutrients. The problem might even lie in the salts in chemical fertilizers. Lets experiment, instead of assuming all carnivorous plants are alike.

    Peter
    the cellist

  3. #11

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    I am starting to think anything goes in the world of Pinguicula cultivation! LOL! One person does not fertilize and their plants are happy and healthy, whereas another person foliar feeds with chemical fertilizers and their plants are also healthy and happy.

    The thing that strikes me about Mexican Pinguicula species is that they are not bog plants. They appear to be lithophytes or semi-epiphytes in nature (some Caribbean species appear to be wholly epiphytic), much like many of the Saintpaulia (aka the ubiquitous African violet) species in Tanzania and Kenya. Curiously enough--and I don't want it to seem like I am forcing a comparison between apples and oranges--most growers recommend that African violets be grown in smallish, shallow pots with a medium of peat, perlite and vermiculite in a 1:1:1 ratio, which is a formula that could also be applied to Mexican Pinguicula in some growing conditions (but obviously not all).

    I think in the future I am going to have a great time experimenting with ping culture. That is, as soon as I get the hang of leaf propagation! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    Corey

  4. #12

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    I was just perusing the latest issue (March 2005) of the Carnivorous Plant Newsletter and noticed there was an article entitled "Disease Symptoms in Pinguicula : Some Causes and Remedies" by L. Legendre and H. Kibellis of the University of Western Sydney.

    It is interesting that two of the disease symptoms mentioned--leaf lamina holes and leaf whitening--appear to be caused by nutrient deficiencies. Both symptoms were treated successfully by growing in a more nutrient-rich mix containing trace elements. The only problem is that with one of the experimental mixes listed in the article (Mix B, which contained a greater quantity of nitrogen) the leaf lamina holes reappeared due to the excess nitrogen encouraging microbial growth in the soil and increased sensitivity to attack on the part of the plants themselves (which is a symptom of an overdose of nitrogen among all plants, not just Pinguicula).

    This aspect of the article concludes by stating (on page 22 of the CPN) that "mineral deficiencies are particularly common in hobbyists' collections because of the widespread use of perlite/vermiculite mixes and no fertilization. These are hard to spot just after repotting and may take several months to fully develop. A transient improvement in plant health may even appear at first because of the washing of excess salts from a previous mix or sudden improved aeration. However, the nutritional needs of Pinguicula and their relationship with temperature, soil pH and texture are unknown. Our study also suggests that one mix may not fit the needs of all species (...) and preliminay results showed that young plants tend to prefer a poorer mix than their adult forms. More work is required in this area."

  5. #13
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Verrrrrrry interesting Ispahan. Thanks for sharing that. It does make you want to rip off a bunch of ping leaves and do lots of experiments. lol
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  6. #14

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    Oh I love what you wrote Ispahan! Gives me a lot to think about.

  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    be careful with blood worms. my throat closed up once from exposure. i had to use my epipen.

  8. #16
    Lauderdale's Avatar
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    Ispahan as soon as your weather up there gets warm enough, put a few of your Pings outside. You will be surprised at the number of insects they will catch on there own.
    Mine are outside year round and the leaves are literally covered in little dead bodies. They do not depend on things falling onto their leaves. They actually have a bug attractant. Most of what they capture are some kind of little gnats but one of my P. 'Sethos' actually caught a full grown house fly.

    One of my P. 'Sethos'. Notice the little D. burmannii in the lower right. D. burmannii in flower + a light breeze = pot hopping.





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