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Thread: Ping leaf cuttings

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I have tried different methods of trying to get leaf cuttings to produce new plants. I have put them in capped 50 ml centrifuge tubes and they funguse up. I have placed them on top of the media, uncovered, with the end partially buried, with no success. I have done the baggie and soil media routine and have 25 % success.

    What about a placing leaves in a container that has media in it, but is overfilled, so that the leaves are resting on top of the water, uncovered, thus providing local humidity and air circulation?

    Would this work for Sarracenia seeds as well?

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    I have only been experimenting with leaf cuttings in this genus for the past two months or so, so I would definitely follow the advice of experts like PinguiculaMan and others on this topic. However, that said, I can think of two possible problems:

    1) Either too little or too much light. Leaf cuttings need bright, indirect light. Anything less than this and I have noticed they will quickly be victim to mold and/or fungal attacks. Any more, and they will quickly wilt and cook.

    2) You may be keeping the medium too wet. Whatever you use, whether peat, LFS or vermiculite, it should only be slightly damp. In other words, if you were to pick up a handful and wring it out, it should not yield any excess water.

    Just my two cents,
    Corey

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I have nearly 100% success with Pinguicula leaf pullings. The number one, most important factor = moisture level. If they are kept too wet they will quickly rot and if they are kept too dry they will shrivel up and die before producing a viable plantlet. I put each variety into a community ziploc bag with a small handful of LFS that was completely saturated until I give it a very hard sqeeze in my hand to remove as much water as I possibly can so that the resulting moss is just slightly moist. There is a somewhat different technique that can work too; put the leaves (by themselves) into an empty plastic container and wait, this technique usually produces plantlets as the parent leaf gradually shrivels up. Leaves kept moist enough to slow the shriveling process while the plantlets form, yet not so moist they rot quickly, can sometimes (once plantlets have formed and been removed) be used to form a second batch of plantlets. A good way to make more plantlets most quickly is to use the smaller leaves from plantlets that are on their way to becoming adult size plants. These young plants can recover very quickly, even if most of their leaves are removed for leaf pullings. This process can continue --> even if you only get 4 plantlets from the initial leaf pulling --> this can lead to 16 if you get the same results from the initial plantlets, the next level produces 64 plantlets. These are very conservative numbers --> this process can be extremely productive.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Precisely:

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Ispahan @ April 26 2005,4:53)]2) You may be keeping the medium too wet. Whatever you use, whether peat, LFS or vermiculite, it should only be slightly damp. In other words, if you were to pick up a handful and wring it out, it should not yield any excess water.

    Just my two cents,
    Corey


    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thank you very much!

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    I have had 100% success so far. I fill a container with LFS (undrained container) up to 0.5 inch under the rim. I fill the container with water about an inch under the top of the LFS. I lay the cuttings on top then cover the whole thing with plastic wrap held on by a rubber band. I have also had success pulling a winter-leaf off and putting it on top of the soil next to the plant.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Tonight, after work, I took a shallow container (2" tall, 12" width, 10" length) and filled it with sand & peat, topdressed with LFS. I placed several cuttings of P. agnata & P. gigantea, along with cuttings from several Red Dragon VFT's, a few D. filiformis, and many Cephalotis follicularis. I partially filled it with deionized water and covered with Saran wrap. I placed in a SE-facing window sill for now and will get a rubber band to seal it along the perimeter. Anything else I should do?

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    I hope it works for you, but it still sounds way too wet for Pinguicula leaf cuttings to me, especially if you cover it with plastic wrap.

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