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Thread: Mexican pings

  1. #17

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    Pyro,

    So your the one who used the crushed coral in your mix. I could not remember where I had read about the crushed coral. It is working out really well so thanks for mentioning it before.
    \"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.\" Dwight D. Eisenhower

  2. #18
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    I tried crushed coral as well but I didn't have good success. Perhaps it wasn't crushed finely enough. I thought my plants had a hard time getting their roots through it. I switched to an airier mix of a little peat, vermiculite, sand and perlite.

    By the way, it is my understanding (from a note by Fernando on Bobz's site) that plants labeled P. kondoi are actually P. reticulata. He says P. kondoi is not currently in cultivation. I don't know if that's old information or still holds true. But I changed my label to P. reticulata.

    Cockatielmother...I think I bought a similar set of plants on eBay. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #19
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    I have found, that for just about every cp, all do well when potted into strait long fiber sphagnum. It isn't too hard to find, it absorbs water much faster than peat, it allows for some air movement, and it's just perfect. I dont think there is a single terrestrial cp that cant be grown in this.

  4. #20
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    I use 1:1:1 peat:sanderlite for my pings growing under fluros and they've been doing well. I switched from 1:1 peat:sand because this resulted in rotting. Good luck.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
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    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  5. #21

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    Greetings,

    If you go to home depot or lowes you can find something called "aquatic plant soil". The company name is Profile. It's basically high fired clay particles. I mix it with peat, perlite, vermiculite, sand, and crushed lava rock.

    Brian

  6. #22

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    Hey Laura,

    You should not be using Bob Z's site as the last definitive word on what is or is not currently in cultivation. Just because Fernando doesn't know of anybody growing P. kondoi or it is not pictured on Bob's site doesn't mean that some of us are not growing it. Remember....those of us who have been growing in excess of 30 years have many species in cultivation that we choose not to publicze. So in a nutshell....yes...Pinguicula kondoi is currently in cultivation in the USA.

    Recently a friend stopped by the nursery to look over the collections. In the greenhouse he stopped by the Ping. collections and his eyes nearly fell out of his head. Not because the plants looked so nice, which they do, but because of how they were being grown. His comment was..."Why are you growing your pings in such shallow containers (1-1/2 to 2" deep) in pure LFS? Why haven't you added peat, pumice, perlite, vermiculite, sand, coral, clay pellets, kitty litter, dolomite lime, crushed granite, knives, forks, spoons, the kitchen sink, ETC

    My reply was merely, why should I? Because everyone else does or because foreign growers say this is how it should be done? Maybe it works for them and like most ALL authors of gardening how-to books or periodicals....they are reporting on what works for them. The premise of all these mix combinations is to aerate the mix. I don't mean to downplay the successes of our members but let's face facts here, many of the members here are measuring their successes on months of culture and not the needed years. Sure...I could add all kinds of ammendments to my mixes and have great results for 3 or 4 months and I could go online and announce this. But what then? After this time frame has elapsed do I post my concerns that my plants are failing and I need help quickly before they all go roots up?

    The European growers may have better luck with an all mineral compost because they may have other environmental factors at play. Their growing conditions may be much cooler than ours, which would deter the breakdown of growing mediums thus lessening the chance of mineral leaching, or their water sources may have completely different mineral suspensions than ours do. All these factors make for a success rate for one grower but a failure for others.

    Just take the basic information you find relevant here and work with that. An open mix. Experiment, experiment, experiment. Be creative but basic. Trying to copy another growers recipe can spell disastor. If you are just starting out with the genus Pinguicula then for heaven's sake keep it simple. Don't try to feverishly re-invent the wheel. If one grower posts that they grow their pings completely submerged in water....DON'T DO IT!!!!! It only works for them under their conditions and they have spent years perfecting it. Until you are an accomplished grower with several years of experiece under your belt and can detect the slightest problem by eye, stick to the basics. Your plants will be much happier for it.

    I received an email a while back from a friend who claimed they were having trouble with their Mexican Pinguicula collection. A few simple questions revealed that they were trying to duplicate an elaborate mix that they had been reading about on these posts. The plants were dying. So making a few changes to the soil mix, by eliminating some of the needless ingredients, and relocating the plants to a cooler location resulted in an immediate recovery of the plants. This person's comments were..."why is everyone trying so hard to create these elaborate recipies whan all you really need to do is...." Yes that's right. Sometimes less....is more.

    It's all trial and error friends. On another note I would like to know what the long term effects of using crushed coral is. Isn't coral a salt water product?

    Phil

  7. #23
    BobZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (philcula @ July 12 2005,8:48)]You should not be using Bob Z's site as the last definitive word on what is or is not currently in cultivation.
    I fully agree! Also, my Photo Finder is not intended to be a definitive word on plant identification either. My purpose is to classify the photos posted on the Web by the identification given by the owner. This allows comparison and debate with the owner about those photos that may not be correctly identified. If I become aware of incorrect identification, I often add a cautionary note after the link.

  8. #24

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    Hi everybody,

    I am writing with a single hand as my second is booked for my new son Alexis (1 month old) that love sleeping along my arm!. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Hence also the delay in updating the website on Pinguicula.

    There are not an unique recipe for growing Mexican Pinguicula but hundreds but very few rules to follow. In fact, everyone should experiment its own mix.

    The rule I would recommand to follow is an open free mix, with or without calcareous component with a carefull watering and a dryness in winter.

    This must be changed according to your growing conditions : for exemple, a dry greenhouse mean more often watering, a wet greenhouse : nearly no watering, only a little amount at the bottom.
    A terrarium : also a light watering

    My recipe works quite well for me and other european growers that have copied my way of growing my plants so this is normal that the mix works well also for them. For others, it doesn't as it dry to quick in dryer conditions...

    The calcareous addition and the free draining media reduce the fungus attacks with plants with stronger roots system; Healthy plants meaning a low risk to loose it...

    BUT this is not the end [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smilie4.gif[/img]

    I still have troubles to grow few species P. oblongiloba, P. parvifolia, P. moctezumae (even if some growers put it as a weed in their cultures) for exemple so I am still trying experiments :
    pure gypsum, gardenning mix, sphagnum moss, peat ...

    And my experiments with Coral : catastrophic but I admit it can work for others and maybe, we have not the same coral in our shops [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    cheers
    Eric Partrat
    epbb@club-internet.fr

    A WORLD OF PINGUICULA
    www.pinguicula.org

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