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Thread: Ping "babies"

  1. #1

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    Hi All,

    I have a couple of pings that were amazing in their production of deep pink flowers this spring, and they also developed several "babies". I need to know how to separate these babies from the parent plant (or if I should), what growth medium to mix, etc., so I can have even more pings!

    Thanks!

    cpwitch
    \"Change is good -- you go first!\" Anon.
    Be sure to visit my website at: http://www.angelfire.com/magic/galengillotte

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Hi cpwitch and welcome to the forums! Do you know what kind of pings they are? If it weren't for the color description, I would have thought that you have P. primuliflora and the "babies" were vegetatively produced plantlets. In which case, I would have strongly advised you to just leave them be. I have tried separating those and ended up losing them,one by one. P, primuliflora has a developed root sysytem and is best propogated by letting them naturally spread. It is senistive to being moved and has iris-colored flowers. However, if you have a Mexican ping, the color is pink and the roots are not nearly as developed. They are much friendlier to being moved around and the plantlets don't react to being separated. In my opinion, to be safe, I would leave things as they are, and wait a little longer until the babies grow up. They will separate themselves. But if you want to do that now, I would use tweezers, one to hold the parent in place and one to apply the separation. I'm sure that there are other ways, too!

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    Thanks for your response! I think my pings may be Mexican pings (?). I got them at Lowe's over a year ago, so they can't be too exotic [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] You say the plantlets will eventually separate themselves, but right now they are hanging over the small pot the parent is in. Should I transplant the entire plant into a larger pot? And if so what's a good soil mix? I don't want to do anything to harm them, but also don't want them to be so crowded that they will suffer.

    Thanks again!

    cpwitch
    \"Change is good -- you go first!\" Anon.
    Be sure to visit my website at: http://www.angelfire.com/magic/galengillotte

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    You're welcome! Mexican pings, for me, have been very compliant when being both moved and separating plantlets. It was the P. primuliflora that I practically butchered in those processes. I watched those plantlets die, one by one.

    Below are two (not so great pics) of two of my Mexican pings. Do they resemble those?





    Here is a P. primuliflora. does it look more like this?



    Okay, maybe the clarity is suspect.

    Soil media: I read so many approaches to ping media and they include LFS, sand, peat, lava rock, perlite - in any combinations. I'm not an expert and haven't done anything more sophisticated than mixing sand & peat, topdressing with LFS. Hopefully, others will chime in and share their mixes. mine grow well, but they don't flower, so there are some variables that I haven't figured out yet.

    If you have a larger pot to use - go for it. They're not fussy. To be certain of avoiding shock, what I do is prepare the new pot first, with rinsed, wet media and carve out a hole in the center, to acommodate a "plug" of the plant. By plug, I mean the soil surrounding the plant, with the undisturbed plant itself, moved as one unit to the new pot. Let us know how it goes!

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    Thanks again Jim. I do think I have Mexican pings -- the leaves are fairly broad and seem to match your pictures. I think I'll try to move the entire plants into a larger pot. That way I won't have to separate the babies but there will be ample room for them to spread out. I guess overcrowding isn't as much of a problem for cp's as other plants due to the small root system. The flowers this Spring just blew me away -- so many from one small plant, so amazing. I want to encourage my pings to to a repeat performance next Spring!

    cpwitch
    \"Change is good -- you go first!\" Anon.
    Be sure to visit my website at: http://www.angelfire.com/magic/galengillotte

  6. #6
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    You're welcome! Hey, wait a minute! Did you say flowers? Um.... we gotta talk. I can't get a mexi-ping to flower if my life depended upon it. P. primulifora... piece-o-cake! The only time I saw flowers from a mexi-ping was in January, when BCK sent me a variety pack and the P. sethos had the very beginnings of a bud. So inherited that one. Another followed and that was it! Mine produce greenish-pink leaf after another, but that's all I get. I have one friend that is reasonably convinced that it is a function of the window pane that is the problem. What are your growing conditions and what do you feed yours?

    Yes, overycrowding for plants with small root systems seem to not be an issue.

  7. #7

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    Merry Meet again Galen!

    Mexican Ping's have proven to be nearly foolproof when it comes to dividing them. I don't even fuss about it any, just gently tug the babies away from the mother and set them in new compost and put a little mix up against the roots. I use a very loose and aerated mix of 40/40/30 perlite/vermiculite/peat and have the best results keeping a uniform moistness vs wetness, not that I think it matters much as friends grow their's very wet with equally good results. They are very forgiving plants and adapt to almost any substrate mix and moisture level. Mine are left totally dry during the winter months after they form dormant buds, which happens when the daylength shortens, usually along about Samhain or a bit before. I treat mine mostly like echeveria, although with a bit more water during the growing season. If you transplant and get broken off leaves, they will quickly bud if laid on a moist compost and make more plants, again behaving very much like echeveria in that.

    Jim, the trick to flowers is giving them enough light, nothing much more than that. With enough light even the resting rosettes flower from time to time. Feeding also helps with the process, but I don't actively feed my plants and still get the flowers
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thanks Tamlin. I would venture to say that SE sills isn't quite enough light to induce flowering. Unfortunately, I have the SW ones clustered and tiered with sundews & bladderworts, so the butterworts have taken a backseat, as it were.

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