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Thread: Need low-growing sedums

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2005
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    I'm gathering several low-growing hardy (zone 5) sedums with which to plant a green roof. Any suggestions where I can get several?

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Lansing, MI, USA
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    Sedums are among my favorite plants. I'd like to suggest something though -- consider growing a border of hens and chicks (sempervivums) around the edge of your roof. You could even create something like a checkerboard by using blocks of sedums alternating with blocks of sempervivums.

    Here are some websites with groundcover type sedums available -- just search under "sedum"

    http://springhillnursery.com/
    http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/index.html

    You can frequently find low growing sedums at local nurseries in 3 inch pot size. Many of those pots have more than one plant in them. Sedums are EASILY propagated by just taking a stem cutting and inserting it in some slightly damp potting soil until it forms roots. Once you have them, you won't be able to get rid of them easily. You could buy the flats now and propagate some additional plants this fall. Then keep them protected over the winter to plant next spring.

    Hens and chicks are supposed to protect your house from lightning strikes! You can find large pots of them at most nursery centers.

    Don't worry too much about getting "named varieties" -- just find one you like and buy a few flats of it for now. I also suggest waiting until spring to start the roof. It's pretty hot right now and even sedums need some moisture!

    I love the sedum that looks somewhat like evergreen leaves. Don't recall the name but it's easy to find.

    Sedum spurium 'Dragon's Blood' turns red in the summer. Another favorite one is the [/I]sedum sieboldi [/I]which is hardy in zone 5 here in wet Michigan. Here is a picture of it: http://www.softel.elblag.pl/~kattka/.../photo_98.html

    Here is another excellent website showing all kinds of possibilities with sedums and sempervivums: http://www.localaccess.com/blackcatnursery/

    NOTE: Our local squirrels consider sedums/sempervivums their winter salad. I have to spray them with hot pepper wax to keep them from being eaten any time of year. In the winter, I cover pots with a piece of window screen. Therefore, think carefully if you want a sedum roof if squirrels are common in your area.

    Sedum acre is another excellent ground cover because of its fine leaves and bright yellow flowers: http://www.bioimages.org.uk/HTML/P3/P34625.HTM

    I could keep going on and on suggesting good ground cover sedums. A quick search online will lead you to many many many more.
    Diana Pederson
    Michigan
    obsessivegardening.com
    christianreviewer.com
    livingwithcockatiels.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Why are you choosing sedum for roof top gardening if you don't mind my asking. It is one of the most recommended plants for a roof but it is so over used. What about herbs? Plants on a roof need to be able to withstand harsh conditions and sedum certainly can do that but everybody is using sedum. Are you allowed to add anything fun like wild onion of buffalo grass?

    Incidentally, roof top gardening is the way to go for many reasons. Good for you for incorporating a roof top garden into your botanical gardens.

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