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Thread: Aristolochia gorgona seed pods

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    Aristolochia spp. seed pods

    Hi,

    Recently I was housesitting for a bud, and at his house I planted a Dutchman's pipe or pipevine a couple of years ago. His does better than mine, and is covered with seedpods from last years flowers. These are fresh, picked three days ago. There should be lots of seeds, they are small and paper thin. The pods are about three inches in length. The vid is a different species.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...AHf5GNtxxcsidA








    They are not carnivorous, but it is said when the flowers are closed they do trap some of the pollinating insects. When closed they kind of look like brains, and when open they look otherworldly. Email if interested in a pod.

    Also, awhile back I spied a plastic pond at an estate sale that had been dumped out and left to dry out for eventual sale, and nearby were several water plants that had been in it. I grabbed a few and took them home. I have a few of those should someone be interested.







    They look pretty beat up, but I planted a couple and within two weeks they were putting out new leaves. Email if interested. Cheers! Spring is almost here!

    Please email rather than pm. My box is full.

    Email to gnixon@satx.rr.com

    Update: One of the pods had started to turn color, and I was going to cut it open, but all I had to do was twist it around a bit and it parted into sections. Each section was full of seeds. They look mature to me.



    Last edited by pearldiver; 02-28-2012 at 09:50 PM.

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    Budgies are best Thagirion's Avatar
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    I love aristolochias. What is your email? You can PM it to me then I can write you back in an email.

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    dsrtfox1942's Avatar
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    Very cool plant. Apparently they are a very potent carcinogen, and some species of caterpillars eat the leaves to gain toxicity to use as a defense.
    Joshua from PA
    Looking for plants with Pennsylvania location data
    Grow List
    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...923#post933923

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    How tall are those aquatic plants. Looks like some spp of Saggitaria ?? I may be interested depending on size.

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    The catapillers that eat them, like the ones that eat passioflora, have ginormous appetites. They can strip a plant of leaves in no time. The ones that go after pipevine are a rust color with black spines. The butterfly is blue. http://www.google.com/search?q=arist...2&ved=0CEcQsAQ

    The ones I have anyway. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...UYpISGQTGGL-Ow

    ---------- Post added at 02:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:49 PM ----------

    Riceman,

    The plants leaves are about an inch wide, and they were six to eight inches tall. The tops were pretty mangled, but I put the extras (about five) in a bucket with rainwater and set them in large aquarium gravel, and they are putting out new leaves. In the pictures you can see some have bulblets attached to the roots, those are about the size of a nickel or a dime. At the bottom of the second photo, there is a purple plastic top of a milk jug. They are good sized plants. With good root systems. Usually with roots and/or meristematic tissue, you are golden.

    Here is one I am keeping.
    Last edited by pearldiver; 02-27-2012 at 01:35 PM.

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    Budgies are best Thagirion's Avatar
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    Aristolochia in North America are host for butterflies of the genus Battus. They are Pipevine Swallowtail Battus philenor and Polydamas Swallow tail - Battus polydamas. I raised some of the latter last year using A. gigantea as a host plant. Polydamas swallowtail is not picky about host plants but the Pipevine swallowtail is. It will not feed on A. gigantea though it will lay its eggs on it the larva will not survive.

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    Sphagnum Guru Wire Man's Avatar
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    If I lived in a warmer climate I'd be all over this. I'd love to see the look on my neighbors' faces when it blooms.

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    Are you sure that is A. gorgona?? The leaves and seed pods look exactly like A. elegans to me. I already grow the latter, but if you can provide evidence that this is in fact A. gorgona, I would be interested.

    Have you opened any of those seed pods to verify that the seed has matured? Normally they have to go brown and dry to the open pod stage before they are ripe.

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