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Thread: Drosera seed trade

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    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    Drosera seed trade

    Hey Folks - I'm a pretty big fan of Drosera graomogolensis, Drosera esmeraldae, Drosera oblanceolata and would love to add any of them to my collection. I have several species of Drosera that are currently flowering and will be harvesting the seeds once the stalks ripen. If anyone has seeds of this species (or a plant) I'd be happy to part w/ any combination of the following seeds (once I have harvested them of course). Feel free to post here or send me a private message.

    -Drosera aliciae
    -Drosera burmannii (may also be sessilifolia or a hybrid of both)
    -Drosera spatulata "Fraser Island" white flower form
    -Drosera tokaiensis

    U.S. only please.

    P.S. I'm not well enough versed yet on which plants are rare/expensive so if it seems like I'm asking to trade a capensis to obtain a hamata please tell me lol.

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    w03's Avatar
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    You are probably going to have a hard time finding D. esmeraldae. It's rather rare among US hobbyists.
    "Potential has a shelf life." -Margaret Atwood
    My meager growlist

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    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    That's a bummer. It's so pretty, I'm amazed it isn't more common.

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    D.esmeraldae is a fairly difficult South American species. It's pretty rare in cultivation here and usually propagated vegetatively. My D.graomogolensis have flowered several times and never produced seed. I'm not sure if this species needs genetically different pollen or not for fertilization but, it seems likely.

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    NatchGreyes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    D.esmeraldae is a fairly difficult South American species. It's pretty rare in cultivation here and usually propagated vegetatively. My D.graomogolensis have flowered several times and never produced seed. I'm not sure if this species needs genetically different pollen or not for fertilization but, it seems likely.
    Johnny, do you have esmeraldae? I, allegedly, have some. I'd agree that it's fairly difficult. It really likes cool temps and high humidity.

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    I do. It's a finicky species.

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    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    So are you guys giving it separate conditions or growing it along with your other dews in a water tray?

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    NatchGreyes's Avatar
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    I doubt it would like a water tray. I'm keeping it with the highland Neps for now. 55 or so at night, sometimes a bit lower, 75 at most during the day. Humidity 75%+. That seems to replicate their native conditions fairly well.

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