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Thread: Free for one NASC donor or bidder: Choice of several

  1. #1

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    Free for one NASC donor or bidder: Choice of several

    This is for anyone who participated in the 2015 NASC auction as a donor or bidder (even if they did not win an auction). Completely free--I'll pay the postage.

    Winner, chosen randomly, picks one of the following. I'll let this go through the end of April.

    1) Begonia bogneri plant:



    2) Petrocosmea 6-pack:

    These are Gesneriads, typically lithophytes and cool-growers that form flat rosettes.

    I'll make it easy for people to look at a bunch of images (Google image search):

    https://www.google.com/search?q=petr...w=1271&bih=524

    The species are: P. begoniifolia, P. flaccida, P. forestii, P. cavalierei, P. HT-2, P. sp. #5 (in no order relative to the photo below).



    3) 5 unrooted Passiflora cuttings:

    Chosen from the following: P. 'Mission Dolores', P. membranacea (Strybing clone), P. membranacea (variegated), P. 'Oaklandia', P. sanguinolenta, P. loefgrenii 'Iporanga', P. 'Preciosa', P. bogotensis, P. luzmarina

    P. 'Mission Dolores', P. membranacea, P. bogotensis and P. luzmarina are cool growers.
    P. membranacea, P. bogotensis and P. luzmarina are generally regarded as difficult to root

    P. 'Oaklandia' is a P. manicata hybrid, perhaps with P. tarminiana, not P. parritae x P. tarminiana as sometimes claimed

    Most of those Passifloras are somewhere in the photo below:



    4) A fern 6-pack, 1 each of 6 species

    This one would require a wait, at least a couple months, possibly significantly longer. I'm growing ferns from spores, and just now starting to transplant the first sporophytes (diploid plants), so far from only 2 species. This will change rapidly over the next several weeks.

    Here are the candidates at the moment which have produced sporophytes:

    Cyathea medullaris (Black Tree Fern)
    Cyathea lepifera (Flying Spider Monkey Tree Fern)
    Platycerium ridleyi (an ant plant, and one of the most unique Platyceriums)
    Platycerium wandae (The largest Platycerium)
    Platycerium 'Celebes' (A cultivar of P. hillii, I think)
    Sadleria cyatheoides (Hawaiian endemic, miniature "tree fern")
    Microsorum punctatum 'Grandiceps'
    Aglaomorpha coronans

    So far I've transplanted 3 each of Micorosorum punctatum 'Grandiceps' and what is hopefully Cyathea lepifera. That one germinated in very small numbers, and I'm told the possibility is high that it could be a contaminant (perhaps an interesting one).

    Here's one of the containers with Cyathea medullaris gametophytes. The sporophytes are visible as the fronds that rise above the see of haploid organisms. If you look hard, you can see that there are quite a few of them--they are all very young.

    Last edited by RandyS; 04-21-2015 at 10:10 AM.

  2. #2

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    Super cool! I'll be the first one in!

    #1 Acro

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    1. Acro
    2. SFLguy thanks for the opportunity! Do all the Passiflora give fruit?

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    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
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    1. Acro
    2. SFLguy thanks for the opportunity! Do all the Passiflora give fruit?
    3. thez_yo

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    1. Acro
    2. SFLguy thanks for the opportunity! Do all the Passiflora give fruit?
    3. thez_yo
    4. Not a Number - thanks, non-CPs!
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    1. Acro
    2. SFLguy thanks for the opportunity! Do all the Passiflora give fruit?
    3. thez_yo
    4. Not a Number - thanks, non-CPs!
    5. patrickntd - Thank you!

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    1. Acro
    2. SFLguy thanks for the opportunity! Do all the Passiflora give fruit?
    3. thez_yo
    4. Not a Number - thanks, non-CPs!
    5. patrickntd - Thank you!
    6. hcarlton
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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    Growlist

  8. #8

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    SFLguy, here's the story on fruit:

    Edible, tasty, self-fertile, but may require manual pollination: P. 'Mission Dolores'
    Edible, requires cross-pollination from a different clone or species: P. 'Preciosa', P. 'luzmarina'
    Edible, requires cross-pollination from a different clone, but very little if anything to eat: P. membranacea
    Edible, but fruit bad tasting, and rarely produced: P. loefgrenii 'Iporanga' (the 'Corupa' strain produces lots of bad-tasting fruit).
    Inedible, fruit or capsule: P. bogotensis (self-fertile, tons of tiny fruit), P. sanguinolenta (capsule, can be selfed when exogenous pollen applied)
    P. 'Oaklandia' is almost certainly edible, but I dont know if it's tasty or whether it's self-fertile.

    I've only tasted P. 'Mission Dolores', 'Preciosa' and membranacea.

    The cool growers are really only possible outside all year in Sunset zones 15-17 (protected from cold in parts of 15), 24 and parts of 22,23 with cooler summers--i.e. coastal California. AHS heat zones 1-3, parts of 4. They are from 2000-3000 m near the equator and have similar demands to most any plants from such locations (utra-highland Nepenthes, Heliamphoras, etc). P. 'Oaklandia' is a bit of an anomaly in this respect, and I've heard a couple reports that it's OK in Florida. Since that only leaves 4 that can survive in a place like Florida, I could probably figure out a 5th one.

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