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Thread: P. parviflora journal.

  1. #17
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I know these are into heat and dryness, but it has to rain occasionally, right? Can't they take some rain?

    Two I. lutea plants just emerged from the planter I have them in. and last night it rained like crazy for an hour. Are they doomed?

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    I know these are into heat and dryness, but it has to rain occasionally, right? Can't they take some rain?

    Two I. lutea plants just emerged from the planter I have them in. and last night it rained like crazy for an hour. Are they doomed?
    Hey Jim. Congratulations on the seedlings! I can't speak for Ibicella, but since it's quite similar to Proboscidea, I can say that they will probably be fine. Just make sure to leave them in full sun for the next couple of days in order to let them dry up a bit.

    If you can, bring them inside next time. Good luck!
    -Joel from Southern California


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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    In addition to the I. lutea that sprang up, 3 Proboscidae parviflora just emerged. The Martynia annua haven't done a thing!

    Aside from having too much water, I also wonder what extreme heat can do to newly emerging seedlings. For instance, right now, we have 90 degree days. Won't they dry out totally and die?

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    If it's too hot, maybe you could place them in partial shade until they grow a bit? Maybe until they begin to grow their first set of true leaves or at least after they open their embryonic leaves? Mine have been in full sun since day 1, but we have yet to reach and stay above 90F for a constant period of time; granted we have had a number of small heat waves. We have been dwelling in the 80's for the most part.

    I did lose one of my seedlings during a heat wave (got up to 100F) we had some time ago (see entry 5/19/08 and 5/20/08), but I am not sure if it was due to the heat, though. The other three survived and had no problems. Larry said it well:

    Quote Originally Posted by larry View Post
    These plants seem indestructible, definitely can withstand full blazing sun. Plant them in the ground if possible and give them plenty of water and fertilizer.
    Since you have only a handful of seeds/seedlings, though, it might pay off to be just a little more cautious.
    -Joel from Southern California


  5. #21
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    It's an open porch, second floor, but I'm sure I can rig something up to give them a little shelter. This is Western NY, though, and getting into the 90's requires a bit of effort. Our average daily high at the peak of summer is 81 F, so most of our summer is between the mid-70's and mid-80's.

    Now it's 3 Ibicellas and 3 Proboscidea... and zero Martynia's!

    What confuses me about Larry's advice is that he recommends lots of water. Aren't they desert Southwest plants? What fertilizer does one use? Why the ground? Insulation?

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    What confuses me about Larry's advice is that he recommends lots of water. Aren't they desert Southwest plants?
    Yes, but I am guessing they can take lots of water easily. I water mine daily without them showing any signs of stress.

    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    What fertilizer does one use?
    I don't know if there is a set recommended dose. I am using a mix of compost, humus, and this slow release fertilizer (19-6-12).

    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    Why the ground? Insulation?
    Because Proboscidea tends to be "ground hugging", gets rather large, and has a large root system.(see here) Your planter/pot will have to be quite large and deep to accommodate an adult plant comfortably.
    -Joel from Southern California


  7. #23
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I don't mind them spreading on the porch but maybe it's their roots systems that need to spread downward. I'll have to evaluate them in a few weeks and replant in the ground. How long do ya reckon they need before repotting?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Here are a couple pictures, from 6/8:




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