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Thread: Proboscidea parviflora Seeds Tan & Black

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I tried indoors a couple years ago. They were stunted. I tried them outside, in a variety of places, including buckets and directly in the ground. Th ones in the buckets were bigger than the ons indoors, but the ones that were sown directly in the ground did the best. They may not have been quite as comfortable or big as theit natural habitat, but I was pleased at one plant in particular. It was over 4' in diameter and the pods were a good 9" long. There' no way that they could be invasive, here. They die out in October, due to our cold climate.

    So do I indeed have 2 species?

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    The may be reverting back to their wild form/characterisitcs. I have been told that the black color indicates the presence of germination inhibitors (which is present in most wild populations). White seed lack germination inhibitors and are therefore easier to grow (hence the development/domestication of the white seed variety of Proboscidea species).

    I have never gotten black seed from my white seed variety plants. However, some of my plants have produced the typical 2-pronged seed pods, which is the norm for wild populations instead of 4 prongs, which is what they were originally selected for. Again, this may simply be just them reverting back to their origins.

    Happy Thanksgiving!
    -Joel from Southern California


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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    How about the flower pictures? do those indicate diffeent species or just how the caera translated them at that time, under those conditions?

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    jimscott,
    Interesting question about possible photographic variations. Of course photographic techniques could cause the very same flower to appear with the differences exibited by the two photos you posted. It could be intentional or accidental. Or they could illustrate natural variation in that species, or even show possibly subspecies status, or just flowers of different ages/different microenvironments. I am going to do a little more research to answer these questions for myself, and I will share them with terraforums, too.

    In this link to Proboscidea parviflora, it shows two flowers with differences in their colors and patterns. Perhaps this species has a wide variation in its flowers. I hope to find out definitively.

    I have not grown any of this species, yet, even though they are native to my area. If I were more familiar with this species and its natural variation, I could, most likely answer your question with more cerainty. I have already obtained seed of this species from the "Native Seed | S.E.A.R.C.H.". I will plant some, this next Spring, I will also plan to stop at the nearby ranger station to see if they have more information on how to locate the plant in the wild.

    Your question has gotten my interest. I think, it should be one genus of proto-carnivorous plant I should be able to grow with minimal effort. It looks to be a quite attractive plant, and I already know I like the taste and nutrition of the seeds - though it takes quite an effort to extract them from the seedpods without getting hooked wickedly by the claws (of course I didn't completely escape that curse, while I was extracting seed myself). I appreciate the determination and skill illustrated by your first photo in this thread.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 11-25-2010 at 09:08 AM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Joel: As far as I remember, all of the plants that germinated came from the seeds you sent, which represent just the one species of "devil claw".

    Joesph: Thanks for the feedback. The reason why I brought up the flowers is that I take several pictures, from a variety of angles, distances, settings, and lighting, in the hopes I can salvage sme decent / clea pictures. I do indeed have color variety, not only within a given species, but from the sam plant. You should see different shades an tints that emanate from the pygmy sundew and the Byblis liniflora flowers!

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    It perfectly normal to for them to show color differences in the flowers, Jim. Here are some of mine that came from the same plant:
    -Joel from Southern California


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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    So do you think they are all parvulflora and not any I. lutea mixed in?

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    So do you think they are all parvulflora and not any I. lutea mixed in?
    Yup. I don't see how they would have any I. lutea mixed in if you didn't have I. lutea around to begin with (right?). In addition, I have not seen or found any concrete evidence that proves that Proboscidea and Ibicella can hybridize, although I would certainly love to.

    Just because the seeds are black does not mean they are of Ibicella. There are, after all, lots more species and varieties of black-seed Proboscidea, one of them being the origins of the Hohokamiana variety that you have there.


    Cheers!
    -Joel from Southern California


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