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Thread: Devils Claw

  1. #9

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    Hi Tim,
    Sarracenia purpurea does attract, trap, kill, digest and absorb its prey complete with digestive enzyme producing ability (albeit less with this species). So how would you describe it as only being "partially carnivorous"?


    A semi carnivorous plant in the pitfall trap would be the teasel that have cupped bracts which trap water; insect material falls in and by bacterial decay, the plant gets a 'foliar feed' by 'accident'. That is what I would call a 'partially carnivorous plant'. There is no evidence for attraction, but looking at purps they have all the hallmarks of a true carnivore.
    Best Regards

    Mike King

    NCCPG National collection holder of Sarracenia

    http://www.carnivorousplants.uk.com

  2. #10

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    I'll quote CPN volume 30 no. 2 on this one: "Juniper et al. (1989) have described carnivorous plants as those that exhibit the 'carnivorous syndrome', which they define as having six attributes with respect to prey: 1)Attract, 2)Retain, 3)Trap, 4)Kill, 5) Digest, 6)Absorb useful substances."

    Carnivory in plants is not cut-and-dry. Some plants don't seem to fit into any particular category, but people try to lump them into categories anyway because it is our nature.

    Chris



    Chris Roy
    Eastern Massachusetts, United States

    I have only made this letter rather long because I have not had time to make it shorter. - Blaise Pascal

  3. #11

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    Adding to all the above!

    I think that enzyme production is not really the basis of how to tell if a plant is carnivorous or not. Even if All sarracenia DIDN'T produce any digestive enzymes they could still legitimatley fall into the 'carnivorous' category. They produce the means to lure and trap the prey. and then after the product has been broken down by bacterial activity absorb the resulting fluid. A good example of a species would be Heliamphora. If I am correct this does not produce any detectable enzymes yet it has a means to attract (nectar) trap (slippery pitcher walls and a bath of fluid) and then absorb the nutritious fluid.

  4. #12

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    I thought purps didnt produce enzymes....

    Oh well. Yah. Helis are the kind of instance i was thinking of, so, anyhow. They are still carnivours. why should that one with the assasin bug be? An why not bronchinnea reducta?

  5. #13

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    Roridula is a plant wich I don't think should be classed as a straight out carnivorous plant as it has no way of making any use of the trapped insects by itself. I think it should be classed as a sub-carnivor.
    The plant has obviously devised a very efficient trapping mechanism. If you have never touched a Roridula, the drops of glue are much stronger than a sundew. So strong that when you pull your finger away from the plant, it doesnt form a long strand that breaks, it pulls the entire plant over to you until the stress causes it to pull away!This seems to elaborate to be purely for self defence and it has been shown that plants with the assasin bugs living on them grow a lot faster than plants without.

  6. #14

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    I thought I would add that almost all animals( and CPs) rely some what on bacteria for digestion. Even we do, so i think if a plant relies on bacteria for digestion they should still be considered carnivorous.

  7. #15
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Back on the S.Purpurea for a second: A quote from D'amato's book:
    Quote
    Insects that encounter the purple pitcher plant,S.Purpurea down in the collected rain water where they slowly decompose by enzymes and bacterial decay.[/QUOTE] And notice the word AND between enzymes and bacterial. So just another point out.

  8. #16
    Shoopdawoop
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    Thats what i was saying, it must have all those atributes to be totally trule stars and stripes, full carnivorous, missing one, means its partially carnivorous, but its still carnivorous, even tho it has a handicap. And someone said earlier that Sarra purpurea does not produce enzymes. But i didnt see ep G's post. DOH![img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/mad.gif[/img] Thanks nep g! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Oh boy.

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