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Thread: Reusing Peat/Sphagnum (a non-renewable resource)

  1. #9
    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    that's a GREAT idea about filling a designated area in your yard with the discarded sphagnum. I've always wanted to have some cp's planted outside, so I'll have to try digging out a small area in my yard, lining it w/ plastic, and then throwing in the old peat/sphag.

    i tend to use really small pots, so i've heard if you have a larger volume of peat/sphag, you will have to worry about changing the soil less often. I am planning to grow my droseras in larger pots this next summer to avoid having to change it that often- i may be overdoing it as well.

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Peat doesn't really loose its acidity too quickly unless you leach your pots an awful lot. Thats why nursery's use peat as an amendment buffer for certain woody plants like Hydrangea. Peat wants to be acidic so it will be and like in our college, our water is limey, we have to use peat as a buffering agent and it works great for a good 2-3 years like phission said. The only real reason to transplant from peat based mixes in CP culture is to restore porosity to the soil and of course to renew the media if its degenerated over time.

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    that's good to know. thanks

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Yes, by reusing I mean, the carnivorous plant has been sitting in it for around 6 months to a year and the acidity of the soil drops, so you have to transplant it.
    You need a pH probe to determine the acidity of the mix; this information can't be deduced by how long mix has been used. "Acidity" of the mix shouldn't be a concern if you are using peat-based mixes; you should be worried more about compaction of the mix over time.

    As a rule of thumb, I usually don't reuse my mix because there was probably a reason why I took the plant out of it! If you reuse it, be sure it's free of pests and that it retains the qualities of a good mix.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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