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Thread: Reintroductions/Restorations on East Coast

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    Reintroductions/Restorations on East Coast

    Hey there,

    I was wondering if anyone knew of attempts to reintroduce native carnivores or restore similar communities in the Northeast, or more broadly, of active conservation efforts in the region. I know of the Pine Barrens, but that's as far as I've gotten. I've joined ICPS, Meadowview and NASC, but I was wondering if anyone knew of opportunities to assist with conservation in the field.

    Thanks!

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    Whimgrinder's Avatar
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    As far as I know, NASC and Meadowview are the two making the biggest impact. Have you inquired with either of them as to how you could get (more) involved?

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    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    The Nature Conservancy might be doing things as well/. They just acquired Splinter Hill bog IIRC

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    theplantman's Avatar
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    Lots of stuff going on in the SE that I'm not at liberty to speak about, but not quite as much up north (as far as I know).

    I personally would like to see the day where there is not only legislation, but a concerted effort by all of the east coast to preserve all at-risk and endangered plants and habitats.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    This spring I plan on introducing state ( not federally!) endangered and extirpated species to local retention basins built to handle rainwater runoff from housing developments and office parks. This isn't really restoration per se, more of a beautification project. These basins are currently home to it a hodgepodge of generalist natives, introduced and invasive species. The species I plan to work with are common species of the coastal plain, but PA had little of this region within its borders, and most of that was developed into Philadelphia International Airport and a landfill.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    Hi Jimboof:

    We're currently working on a Sarracenia purpurea restoration project in Massachusetts so please contact me at meadowview@pitcherplant.org if you want to get involved. The project involves restoring a former commercial cranberry bog to an Atlantic white cedar wetland system, including native Sarracenia purpurea. We're raising 600 S. purpurea for the project with delivery set for 2016. If you want to come and visit us at Meadowview you could help with the propagation phase, and perhaps be involved in the planting phase.

    Sincerely,

    Phil Sheridan, Ph.D.
    President and Director
    Meadowview Biological
    Research Station

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whimgrinder View Post
    As far as I know, NASC and Meadowview are the two making the biggest impact.
    While not in the Northeast, Atlanta Botanical Garden has done great work protecting, enhancing & expanding rare Sarracenia stands.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    (with Pics)

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    theplantman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    While not in the Northeast, Atlanta Botanical Garden has done great work protecting, enhancing & expanding rare Sarracenia stands.
    ABG's commitment to Sarracenia goes all the way back to the late 80s. Same for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. S. purpurea ssp. venosa var. montana, S. leucophylla, rubra "Ancestral Form," oreophila, and jonesii still exist in situ because of the efforts of conservation-minded institutions like those. The genetic material, even from extirpated sites, is additionally protected via safeguarding.

    Let me also add that the Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance, of which ABG is a founding member, is making significant headway on behalf of many of GA's rare plants. An Alabama Plant Conservation Alliance has already been founded, and it is hoped that sister alliances will pop up throughout the southeast.

    While these efforts are not exclusively directed at Sarracenia, carnivorous plants and mountain bog habitats are high on the priority list. For the APCA, very good efforts are being directed at Sarracenia alabamensis ssp. alabamensis.

    http://atlantabotanicalgarden.org/co...vation-efforts
    http://gump.auburn.edu/boyd/apca/Welcome.html
    Last edited by theplantman; 12-21-2014 at 12:12 PM.

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