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Thread: Planting some in non native area

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Hi all
    Yep going to check on them and see thier progrress.. This is just to see if they would survive in Philly... It is kinda neat to see if they would grow near a creek that preety wild with lots of weeds but found a place that si not to over grown and wet most of the time and humid.. Im sorry if I aggitated anyone with this but it will be watched and if they grow in such a place ( most is not kept up to well) and to show my son something beautiful growing and turning an area that is kinda not nice into something kool is worth this

    Jim

  2. #10
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    Jul 2001
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    I don't think that you aggitated anybody here about you planting vft's. Vft's are such a low risk plant that it's unimagiable that it could ever become an invasive species.
    Here's a couple of helpful tips.
    This winter cover them with pine straw. Don't use hay or plastic.
    In the spring uncover them. If possiable and safe you can burn the straw off the plants.

    Please get us updated on how it comes out.

  3. #11

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    Quote
    Most cp's compete for space in bogs and cp's almost always loose the battle. You could plant most species of cp's without worry almost anywhere.[/QUOTE]

    On the contrary, many CPs do well in bogs - if they didn't, they wouldn't be there in the first place. I think Sarracenia purpurea has the potential to spread aggressively in Irish bogs - when the conditions suit it it can multiply very fast, and I wouldn't like to see it introduced outside its native range. I think U. inflata has been introduced into lakes in Washington state, where it is making itself a right nuisance. Just because they're CP, doesn't mean they can't be invasive in the right conditions. I agree VFTs are unlikely to cause much harm, but other species could.

    Giles

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