User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 23

Thread: Ideas from the cp community to help save cps

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just finished some things for the big NECPS CP Show tomorrow. Tens of thousands of people visit the Jack O' Lantern event during October where we are having the show - so we are hoping to attract lots of the public.

    I created a Conservation poster with paragraphs/pages on the Green Swamp in Danger, VFT Poaching (and artwork of holes in the ground), "What can you do to help". It's great because the poster will stay at the Roger Williams park Greenhouses after the show is over!! I'm hoping we can get a photo of the poster for you all to see.

    Also, we will have an ICPS Conservation Fund donation can, and copies of Ozzy's Green Swamp petition.

    I hope everyone in the region can come to the show!!

    WildBill

  2. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Folks,

    These are all very good suggestions. I'll add a few thoughts on this.

    On buying land....unfortunately, this is not a workable solution for most folks or even small nonprofits like the ICPS. You see, in order to have a viable population of plants protected, you have to buy not only the land they live on, but you also have to have some kind of assurance that the things happening off your site will not affect your property. A nearby agricultural facility might be pumping fertilizers/pesticides into the groundwater, and screwing up your hydrology. Your neighbors might not like your yearly prescribed fires. (Air quality concerns could shut you down, too.) So when I hear people say, "Oh,we should buy the land those plants live on," I think to myself...."Well, it's more complicated than that...."

    So what can the average person do? First, you can support those conservation organizations that can rally forces enough to do what you want. Sure, the ICPS has a small conservation program. But there are larger national nonprofits you can join and support.

    Another important thing you can do is write your local politician every time something comes up that you're concerned about. The more local your politician the louder your voice (so, contacting a county politician on something in his or her jurisdiction may pack a more potent punch than writing the president of the USA). You'd be surprised at how much punch a clearly written, nonprofane, but earnest letter can carry. These politicians do pay attention to these letters. They may not act on each one, but letters from their constituency frighten them!

    Doing things like patrolling the net is a great idea. If you see something that looks like a bogus sale on Ebay, email the seller, try to find out what's going on. Sometimes these people will admit that they've got poached plants (never underestimate the stupidity of a criminal!) and if they do that, you can bust them on Ebay.

    What can the horticulturist do?

    Welllll, first off, keep clean. Do not trade with people who have poached plants. I know one grower who thinks that poaching is wrong, but has no problem with getting poached seed from another grower. This is wrong. Stay on the very high road, and you'll set a good example for other people. Alas, land managers of rare plants do not like to tell horticulturists where to see rare plants because poaching is so bad. The only way to change that perspective is to change the culture of horticulturists. That means us.

    If you have endangered plants, keep records of how you got them. Then, propagate your plants as much as you can, and give them to other growers. Spread the wealth. Make the rare plants as common as dirt (peat?) in collections. This will help decrease poaching pressures.

    Also, try to get out into the field from time to time and enjoy the plants in the wild. It will rejuvenate your conservation energies. And while you're out in podunk-wherever, when you stop to get gas or buy lunch, mention to the local (as you hand them your money) that you're sightseeing in the area...that you're there to see the plants in Razorback Hollow (or where ever). Nothing like tourist dollars in the hands of locals to make people value the natural areas in their own back yard!

    Just some thoughts!

    Later!
    Carnivorous Plant Newsletter
    Co-editor

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi everyone -

    I finally got back some photos ( and scanned em )from the NECPS show. Here is a pic of the Conservation poster I had created. This was the thing I was most proud of at the show and it felt great everytime I looked over there and saw kids and adults alike reading it. It's now a part of the NECPS educational materials so our members can check it out and use it when they give talks, etc.

    The top part was printed on a yellowish paper and I burned the edges with matches. The holes in the ground picture was created from photos, stripped together with an illustration image of the holes I created. The whole thing is on 20 inch by 30 inch black foamboard.

    [img]http://home.**********.com/wildbill/ConsPostWeb.jpg[/img]

    WildBill

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nice Poster!

    Any chance you can post the text. It's a bit dodgy to read in parts.

    Barry
    Carnivorous Plant Newsletter
    Co-editor

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Manchester, Connecticut
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think this is the most recent version of the text we used:

    100 Venus Flytraps Stolen!!
    Poached From The Wild

    Just a few weeks ago, in late September 2003, approximately 100 Venus Flytraps were illegally poached from Lewis Ocean Bay Heritage Preserve near the Conway/Myrtle Beach area of South Carolina. Anyone with information is urged to call the Department of Natural Resources at 1-800-922-5431. A reward is offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible. The stolen plants may have been illegally exported to Europe where they are very popular. Most will die due to lack of proper care making this is a terrible crime because these plants are limited to a VERY small area in the wild. Venus Flytraps only grow naturally within a 100-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina and Wild Venus Flytraps could soon be extinct.

    Like the rare and endangered Bog Turtle, carnivorous plants are disappearing from the wild. There are very very few places left to see them in nature due to poaching for profit, habitat destruction, and invasive species. In the United States, humans have irreversibly developed 95% of carnivorous plant wetland habitat. These areas have been drained to form golf courses, tree farms, malls, and housing complexes. Some areas have been mismanaged - fires that occur normally have been prevented or put out. Fire naturally opens back up overcrowded crowded habitats for carnivorous plants that survive by springing back from the submerged roots. Other plants, which escaped from people's gardens, can also crowd out native carnivorous plants in the wild. Here in the Northeast an invasive plant species Purple Loosestrife is destroying marshes and bogs ruining carnivorous plant habitats.

    _



    Wetland Genocide In The South ~ The Green Swamp is in Danger

    The Green Swamp, in North Carolina, is an ecosystem second in biodiversity only to the Great Rainforest (a quote from The Nature Conservancy). The Green Swamp is home to Venus Flytraps, Sundews, Pitcher Plants, Butterworts and Bladderworts. 17 different confirmed carnivorous plant species include: Dionaea muscipula, Sarracenia flava, rubra, purpurea, minor, Pinguicula caerulea, lutea, Drosera capillaris, intermedia, filiformis, brevifolia, Utricularia cornuta, juncea, inflata, purpurea, subulata and gibba. In addition to poaching and development, The Green Swamp is facing two enormous threats: 1). The Industrial Paper Company is unmercifully draining this 350,000 acres, has removed the native Long Leaf Pines and hardwoods found in its forested wetlands, and converted this once beautiful place to tree farms and heavy herbicide use with poisonous drift capable of polluting huge areas. 2). A enormous landfill is proposed to be put in the heart of the swamp that will pollute surface and ground water and air of the swamp for eons of time into the future.

    "The scariest thing is when you walk in to the swamp and you think how quite and peaceful it is. Then you realize it's too quiet, no birds, squirrels, deer. I have yet to see any live animal other than a few bugs there. This is the only wilderness place I have ever been to and not heard a bird singing. That's something to think about. Most of the land that you see undisturbed is owned by The Nature Conservancy. Thank God that they do or nothing would be left. They burn and manage the land, and try to keep it the way it's supposed to be, full of cp's (carnivorous plants)." Native resident and CP enthusiast, "Ozzy"
    ____

    What Can You Do To Help?

    Today, there is no need to steal plants from the wild. There are millions of plants that are raised from tissue culture (TC) and greenhouse culture, as well as extra plants raised by other growers like NECPS members. TC and other "captive bred" plants are probably cheaper and more healthy than those that are poached, so there really isn't any reason at all to poach. You should be suspicious if a plant for sale is not labeled and/or the seller will not say where they got it. Be suspicious of inexpensive full-grown plants offered for trade on online auctions - with minimal effort, you can check around and if it seems too good to be true, it might be poached. You need to know where your plants came from for 2 reasons, 1) to eliminate poaching, and 2) so you know how to care for the plant. The more you know about a plant's native growing area, the more you will fight to preserve it. There ARE groups that work to save these places like the International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS), Nature Conservancy, and Sierra Club.

    Organizations:

    The Appalachian Mountain Club
    www.outdoors.org

    The Nature Conservancy
    www.nature.org

    The International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    www.carnivorousplants.org/index.html

    The Sierra Club
    www.sierraclub.org

    The Swamp Watch Action Team
    www.swampwatch.org

    Thanks to Ozzy for his help with this. We also had put out a donation can at the October Show for the ICPS conservation fund. Dave Sackett, NECPS treasurer and I talked about the idea of setting aside a percentage from the monthly plant auction sales for the fund also - but we will need to have an official society vote on it.

    WildBill

  6. #14
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Greenswamp, NC
    Posts
    13,747
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's very well put together. I think everybody knows that The Green Swamp is my home and it's my number one project. I can't thank you enough for your help. If you ever want a tour of the Green Swamp, I'd Love to give you one.

  7. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Westchester County, New York
    Posts
    5,377
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You guys should have seen everyone reading it at the show!

    Bill really did a bang up job on that poster.

    Kudos, Wildbill! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    17 Nash Rd.
    North Salem, NY 10560

    YOU! Outta my gene pool!

  8. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Martinez, California
    Posts
    3,556
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've contacted Ozzy on this one (PM) but it probably isn't workable. I suggested for the Federally Endangered sites, to place video cameras activated by motion sensors. I hate being Big Brother, but video cameras would be a silent watcher, and if well hidden, can probably do the job that a person cannot do at this time. It probably isn't economically feasible to do this, but it could catch quite a few unscrupulous people destroying our wetlands plant and animal life. It seems pretty necessary to me, too much has been lost already, we cannot afford to lose anymore. I'd be interested in feedback from anyone.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •