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Thread: Native species, conservation, etc.

  1. #1

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    Hello all!!
    I've been wanting to start something like this for a while, and now is the best chance!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img] First, I will tell you places that you could find info about CP's native to your area, in order of credibility:

    1) Updated wildflower books: I am a pretty avid wildflowerer (if that's a word), and I always see all Cp species in my state (at least that I'm aware of)

    2) Internet: Sometimes these can best the books, if it's your state's parks and wildlife site. Some "home made" sites may list introduced or no longer existing species...

    3) Museums, field biology centers, etc.: These are a bit iffy, due to the fact that there aren't too many dedicated CP biologists out there [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rolleyes.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]

    4) Older wildflower books: Sometimes just as good as new ones, but you never know the crdibility, if the names have changed, or something else... Downsides are similar to "home made" web sites.

    Now that I'm done with that, I will list the species native to Texas: (Rampuppy, Phil, I beat ya to it! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img] )

    Utricularia gibba
    Utricularia subulata
    Utricularia inflata
    Sarracenia alata
    Drosera brevifolia
    Drosera capilaris


    The three Utrics can supposedly be found in my area, and gibba, surprise, surprise, isn't even remotely threatened. I am unaware of the status of U. inflata and U. subulata, although they seem prolific in the places that they do grow, but then again, so do the Sarrs. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img]

    The Sarracenia alata supposedly only lives in isolated areas in eastern Texas. Jeff (Jaie said he knew of a few places, but with him at colledge (sp?), I am unaware of these sites still) Phil, Rampuppy?

    Drosera brevifolia supposedly grows in sidewalk cracks in some parts of Houston during the wet season, as well as alongside S. alata. Drosera capilaris grows alongside Sarracenia alata in wetlands and bogs.


    If anyone knows of any CP sites in Texas, I will start some sort of protection, reintroduction program right away! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]
    I am back..

  2. #2

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    Quote
    Drosera brevifolia supposedly grows in sidewalk cracks in some parts of Houston during the wet season, as well as alongside S. alata[/QUOTE]
    don't you mean drosera rotundifolia? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

  3. #3

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    No, there is indeed a species called Drosera brevifolia... Unless the name has changed since 1997 [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img] BTW, do you have anything to add to this, Spec? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]
    I am back..

  4. #4
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    NEBRASKA -
    Urticularia vulgaris
    UTRICULARIA MINOR

    Purpurea

    There are others mentioned, but I have to confirm.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  5. #5

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    Quote (lithopsman @ June 02 2003,1:59)
    No, there is indeed a species called Drosera brevifolia...[/QUOTE]
    I know that, I was saying you mixed brevifolia up with rotundifolia, or was it me who mixed them up? I thought the savage garden said rotundifolia were found in the cracks of sidewalks, not brevifolia, but he does have alot of mistakes in his book [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img]

  6. #6

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    I don't know if that's a mistake or not, all I know is we have brevifolia, at least according to the wildflower books, but they could be wrong... I hope to raise some money to replinish a few bogs in my state, that would be AWESOME!!!! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/alien.gif[/img] First, I have to find sites that bogs are/were located, so I can replenish them... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]
    I am back..

  7. #7
    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    You have to be careful when you introduce new plants into a bog. You could introduce a different variety to that bog, or that bog could have a variety that's unique to that bog. If you plant something in that bog that isn't that variety and their genes get's into the gene pool, that variety will be gone forever. Just say you have a bog that has coppertop S.flava's, and say this is the last bog that has them. You what to help by planting some S.flava's that you bought at a garden center. If you plant that plant with the coppertops, and they breed together, coppertops would be gone forever. I know this example is extreme but I just want you to see the dangers. If you can confirm that the plant that you plan to introduce is the same variety and the same genetic makeup as the population of the site then there should be no problems.

  8. #8
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    Alaska:
    U. vulgaris
    U. minor
    U. intermedia
    P. vulgaris
    P. villosa
    D. anglica
    D. rotundifolia

    I've managed to locate all of our native species in the wild. I think the most important thing is learning what conditions the plants like and then finding those habitats. In my experience wild flower field guides aren't very specific about habitats. Just my personal experience though [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img]

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