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Thread: CP ethics

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Are all cp's considered oflimits to collect or is it up to the locality? Supposing I come across a pitcher plant this summer while walking along our local creek. Can I take one home as a souvenir?

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    First of all why would you want to take it when it's local and you could visit it any time you wish?




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    SirKristoff is a poopiehead Ozzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Are all cp's considered off-limits to collect or is it up to the locality?
    The answer to this question is no. There are some reasons to collect some plants. Some of the reason's are scientific studies, to put a plant in tissue culture so they will become widespread. I'm sure that there are not many members here that can meet either of these criteria.
    The only ethical way for you to take a plant out of the wild is to meet the guidelines set by the ICPS.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]We support the practice of knowledgeable and responsible field collection only when (A)it is not in violation of the law (B)it is with the intention of introducing plants into cultivation by the collection of only a small amount of wild material İonly a small percentage of plants are taken.
    We recognize that without experienced people with horticultural and/or botanical interests selecting and propagating species from the wild, there would be fewer choices of propagated horticultural material and consequent increased pressure on wild habitats with illegal or inappropriate collecting, and there would be less knowledge gathered on the nature of the plants.
    We would encourage collectors to be responsibly aware that rare plants merit special consideration and should not be distributed or propagates taken unless there is a sufficient local stock to successfully perpetuate the population. most cases this means no collecting should be done.
    For it to be ok to take a plant from the wild all four criteria must be meet.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Supposing I come across a pitcher plant this summer while walking along our local creek. Can I take one home as a souvenir?
    The first rule says that by you taking the plant no laws must be broken. If it's not your land and you don't have written permission from the land owner than you probably have not meet the first rule.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]We would encourage collectors to be responsibly aware that rare plants merit special consideration and should not be distributed or propagates taken unless there is a sufficient local stock to successfully perpetuate the population. most cases this means no collecting should be done.
    I can think of no pitcher plant that will meet the above rule. Every pitcher plant site that I know of does not have enough plants where the whole population won't be harmed by the removal of a few plants. So the answer to your second question is no. It is not all right to take a pitcher plant that you happen to walk by. Unless it's your own property it is stealing and poaching. Even if it's state owned land. Most states will prosecute.
    Now my personal feelings about taking plants from the wild.
    The only criteria (assuming that it's legal) that I consider is if taking the plants will harm the overall population, or the ecosystem around the plant. Before you take any samples, you have to do your research and know if the plant is threatened and if it's legal to take it. There are very few cp's that meet this rule. Mostly the only cp that'll be established enough for some to be removed are some bladderworts. Some places are so overgrown with bladderworts that it can help the population by removing some. Sometimes they can acutely be a nuisance. Alot of fisherman will throw bladderworts on the bank when they reel it in on their line. I remember reading about a state (I think it was Washington) was asking people to remove as much of the bladderworts (I forgot which bladderwort it was) that they could.
    In the end you have to decide for yourself if it's right to take a plant from the wild. In the case of a pitcher plant, I can tell you the answer, and it's no.




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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thank you. I'll stick to TC and trading posts!

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    I also agree with Ozzy's statements. Indiscriminate collection of any wild CP must be discouraged. No individual should have the right to take what belongs to all.

    So saying, I am also well aware that there is a difference between talking the talk and walking the walk. Many who would (and have!) agreed in public with these statements have also, at whiles, brought home a plant of two.

    In the end, this will all depend on personal conscience, no matter what legislation is in place, or what ethical opinons have current sway.

    This very problem is currently a major focus of discussion on the Conservation Forum. I urge that all members become involved with the discussions relative to the formation of The Sarracenia First National Democratic Collection, and to keep this topic open for discussion and consideration.

    The question of personal Liberty regarding these plants is probably the single most important CP issue in the world today. If we are to save any of the remaining 2% of our American Pitcher Plants, NOW is the time to heed the call. We need your insight, no matter if you are 15 or 65.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    I think it would be ok =if you found a large population of a fast growing species to take a FEW seeds or 1 OR 2 cuttings.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

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    The problem is Pondboy that Sarracenia are a slow growing species.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Sarracenia aren`t a species they are a genus! He wasnt asking about only sarracenia he was sayin` "Are all cp's considered oflimits to collect or is it up to the locality?" I believe it would be ok to take a few seeds since they are abundently produced,and have a much higher germination rate in captivity.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

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