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Thread: 8,190 Dionea for sale

  1. #1

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    Too bad all of these plants probably died

    This is an exerpt from "Examination of the US Pitcher-plant Trade With a focus on the White-topped Pitcher-plant" By C.S. Robbins

    http://www.traffic.org/bulleti....de.html


    The only recent documented case of illegal Sarracenia trade in the USA involved a shipment of carnivorous plants which was destined for the Netherlands but intercepted by authorities at Baltimore International Airport in January 1996. The shipment consisted of 8190 Venus Flytraps [ed. wow] Dionaea muscipula, 130 Purple Pitcher-plants and one Sweet Pitcher-plant [rubra] , all of which had clearly been removed from the wild in North Carolina and intended for commercial resale and artificial propagation (Lieberman, in litt., 1996). The shipment was not declared to the appropriate US authorities prior to export and false documentation accompanied the plants (Lieberman, in litt., 1996).

  2. #2
    goldtrap2690's Avatar
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    wow , your busting people faster then that those tv shows , you should be a mod Nepenthe , and as for this case , i can't believe there were that soo many plants [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img]

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    Thanks for this very focused and excellent article. On reviewing it I am again struck with the notion that figures can certainly lie, and even hard data can be skewed, and even the best meaning legislative tools fail. There will never be a way to really assess the levels of population depradation and attrition, because legislative mechanisms depend on a basic honesty that often goes by the by when there is a buck to be made. I wonder what the punishment for such a documented crime was, and if it was paid?

    It was a very good account though of some of the reasons why the populations are so endangered. It is partly our own desire that places a premium on these pretty weeds. As long as we allow commercialism of Sarracenia to remain operable, we will likewise continue to add stress to these populations which are already very bad off. By purchasing plants we may well be contributing to field collection, all unawares. Sure, not all dealers field collect, but how to be sure? Two things I know - water runs downhill, and money talks. It's easy to develop a blind eye when one is seeing dollar signs, and really not to hard to be overly concerned about just where those rhizomes came from, initially.

    This is why a National Collection would be advisable, sensible, and in my opinion, essential. Low cost and massive distribution will eventually result in a loss of profit possibility, at least insofar as horticulture goes. It will also conserve these plants in the only long term way which is likely to be possible, which is in a private stewardship. Pitcher Plant sales is one market that NEEDS to be flooded (and my apologies to commercial growers of these plants in advance).

    I am sorry if there are losses of possible revenue to commercial dealers. All I can say is I am for the plants, and they are in trouble. I realize this concept is difficult to put across in a capitalistic society, but unless we can find a way to share these plants equally, kick out the profit motive, we are going to lose them.

    I am concerned about "long term" protection because legislation designed to protect the plants can change so quickly, and with just a few administrative misdecisions, great loss can result as more land is taken in the name of progress (this is current practise). This includes State and Federal preserves. Any law protecting these plants can fall to the forces of convenient profit.

    Nor are Botanical Gardens a safe long term Haven: such institutions will rise and fall or lose interest.

    Individual growers are the only self renewing resource that will actively seek to conserve and preserve these plants. Although individuals and generations may come and go, our love and reverence for them will also speak to a new generation of stewards. Growers will always be here.

    What is needed now is an self renewing INSTITUTION that will also act to solicit and maintain these rapidly disappearing taxa, and draw on the best resources from a concerned community. Right now there is something left to preserve, but the hour is getting late.

    Sorry, I have gone a bit off topic. But, like water running downhill, all discussions regarding Sarracenia Conservation end up in this place for me.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    I am in favor of the idea of Banning all sarracenia from collection, however, may have undesirable side effects. The really rare plants are poached the most. Banning all commercialism of Sarracenia will also effect nursery growers who distribute the plants to CP’rs. You know some peole will go out of their way to get their hands rare pitcher plants. By banning all sarracenia from trade, it will make them rare in circulation. And, in some peoples eyes, more desirable, right?

    All in all, however, the benefits would outweigh the risks.
    that makes no logic

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    I feel that the natural habitats should be monitored and barbed off allowing only people with admission to enter and view the bog. The privately owned bogs...well that's another story.

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    The only acceptable way of obtaining new horticulturally significant plants is by cuttings from wild plants. This should be supervised by landomners together with conservation groups like ABG or seed collection (small quantities!).
    This way one does not muck around with the gene pool in the locaalitites where the plants grow.
    Best Regards

    Mike King

    NCCPG National collection holder of Sarracenia

    http://www.carnivorousplants.uk.com

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    I agree with you Mike in all regards. Your collection is certainly a national treasure, and I would love to see this duplicated here.

    Banning Sarracenia sales will not work, but providing a non-commercial source of the more rare material will sure discourage field collection for resale, and should be a focus for anyone who has this material already in hand.

    Such a collection would need to have some prestige. I think the ABG would be a great home for such a collection.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  8. #8

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    I assume ABG = atlanta botanical gardens?

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