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Thread: importing...

  1. #25
    Never Knows Best gill_za's Avatar
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    Ron, NaN,

    Thank you for replies. It would be so helpful is someone who deals with this on regular basis would post a comprehensive step by step how-to.

    I am interested in ordering few plants from BCP, mexican pinguicula and petiolaris drosera and utrics. From what I have gathered these plants are not protected by CITES (unless I made a mistake searching). It seems that I need to apply for the permit for generally admissible plants (587) and the sender upon my request will provide the Phytosanitary certificates (for additional fee ). Does this sound correct. What did miss?

    PS: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_heal...aterials.shtml
    If I order less than 13 items I don't need the permit?
    Last edited by gill_za; 04-28-2012 at 09:37 PM.

  2. #26
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    This circular summarizes everything you need to know. I've prepared a article that I need to clean up and add links to resources such as these. After that I'll submit it to the staff as a post in the article section.

    See also
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_heal.../nursery.shtml

    Please note all mail shipments must be sent to a plant quarantine inspection center and not directly to the importer. The green and yellow label (PPQ Form 508) must be attached to the outside of the parcel. If the lot size is 12 or less then PPQ 587 is not required, just the phytosanitary certificate. However the package must be addressed to one of the inspection centers. The final destination address (you) must be included inside the package.
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  3. #27
    IronTom's Avatar
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    Hopefully this won't be too far off topic.

    I'll be in San Jose, CR for a few days for a business meeting next week. If I stumble across a reputable looking nursery and wanted to bring back a few things, what sort problems could I expect? Is it permissable to bring "personal" plants into the country? Or are permits needed no matter the amount of plants?

    Other than the phytosanitary documentation that the nursery should be able to provide, is there anything else?

    It's my first trip outside of the states, and I have no habla of espanol. So I'm a little nervous about it and decided not to hang around any extra days after the business is through. If someone knows of a good nursery in the San Jose or Cartago area, I'll do my best to make a side trip.

  4. #28
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    If it's less than 13 plants all you need is the phytosanitary certificate. That's the limit that is allowable in baggage. Any more and you need the PPQ 587 permit.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #29
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    I will attempt to clear some of the confusion and misconceptions regarding the legal importation of Plants (include plant parts) and Seed in the US.

    As per Code of Federal Regulations (Agriculture) Title 7.319, United States Code Title 7 (Agriculture) and United States Code Title 19 (Customs and Duties). Violations are punishable by criminal and civil penalties per United States Code Title 18 (Crimes and Criminal Procedures) - basically fines and/or imprisonment up to $250,000 or six years incarceration.

    These regulations apply regardless if you are given, trade or buy plants and seeds on eBay, a website or through some other form of communication.

    Falsely declaring plant material as many eBay sellers do as "craft items" is violation of the US Code 19 Customs and Duties and you can be penalized for Customs violations.

    Importing plants without the proper permits and Phytosanitary Certificates and bypassing the Plant Protection and Quarantine inspection is in violation of CFR 7.319.

    You are dealing with two regulating and enforcement agencies - The Department of Homeland Security (Customs) and the USDA (APHIS). Either or both can bring charges against you, sometimes years apart.

    Definitions:

    Lot - is a standard term used in the grain and seed industry
    The Seed Lot defined as: a quantity of seed that is uniform to percentage of pure commodity seed and the germination rates; other viable non-commodity seed & recognized noxious weed seed, organic and non viable inert contaminants.

    From CFR Title 7:
    301.92–1 Lot. A contiguous block of plants of the same species or cultivar, of the same container size and and from the same source, if known.

    318.13–2 Lot. A number of units of a single commodity, identifiable by its homogeneity of composition and origin, forming all or part of a consignment.

    Plant. Any plant (including any plant part) for or capable of propagation, including a tree, a tissue culture, a plantlet culture, pollen, a shrub, a vine, a cutting, a graft, a scion, a bud, a bulb, a root, and a seed.

    Plants for planting. Plants intended to remain planted, to be planted or replanted.


    Prohibited article.
    Any plant for planting designated in 319.37–2 (a) or (b), except wood articles regulated under 319.40–1 through 319.40–11, “Subpart—Logs, Lumber, and Other Unmanufactured Wood Articles.”

    Regulated plant. A vascular or nonvascular plant. Vascular plants include gymnosperms, angiosperms, ferns, and fern allies. Gymnosperms include cycads, conifers, and gingko. Angiosperms include any flowering plant. Fern allies include club mosses, horsetails, whisk ferns, spike mosses, and quillworts. Nonvascular plants include mosses, liverworts, hornworts, and green algae.

    Restricted article. Any plant for planting, excluding any prohibited articles listed in 319.37–2(a) or (b) of this subpart, any articles whose importation is not authorized pending pest risk analysis under 319.37–2a of this subpart, and excluding any articles regulated in 319.8 through 319.28 or 319.41 through 319.74–4 of this part and any articles regulated in part 360 of this chapter.

    Permits and Certificates Required:


    Small Seed Lots – 50 seeds, 10 grams or less of any one taxon, no more than 50 taxa per shipment

    Documentation

    Required

    Notes

    PPQ 587

    Yes

    Registered For Small Seed Lots

    Phytosanitary Certificate

    No

    seed must be free of any pests,diseases, plant or non-plant material other than seed

    CITES (PPQ 621)

    Yes*, to applicable species

    Shipper must include copies of their CITES certificates



    Plants or Seed – for Lots of 13 or more or seed quantities greater than 50 seeds or 10 grams

    Documentation

    Required

    Notes

    PPQ 587

    Yes

    Registered for General Importation of Plants

    Phytosanitary Certificate

    Yes

    Certifies plants are free of pests and disease and meets importrequirements of US

    CITES (PPQ 621)

    Yes*, to applicable species

    Shipper must include copies of their CITES certificates


    Plants or Seed – for Lots of 12 or less (where qty of seed > 50 seeds or 10 grams per taxa)

    Documentation

    Required

    Notes

    PPQ 587

    No


    Phytosanitary Certificate

    Yes

    Same as above

    CITES (PPQ 621)

    Yes*, to applicable species

    Same as above


    * CITES permits are not required if plants were propagated from tissue culture and sent in sealed flasks and sterile media. However they must be accompanied by certificates of artificial propagation or export permits.


    Plants – see above for definitions


    Costs (as of February 2012)

    PPQ 621 (CITES)

    $70 USD

    PPQ 587

    free

    Phytosanitary Certificates

    Determined by the Issuing Country, cost is passed on to the importer/buyer. Some countries require one certificate per taxon, others one per shipment. Costs are subject to currency exchanges rates. Costs range from $20 to over $200 USD





    Regardless of which permits and certificates are required all plant material must pass through one of the Plant Protection and Quarantine inspection centers on entering the US.


    I contacted a Senior Import Specialist at the APHIS Headquarters in Riverdale, MD with these specific questions:

    Q: A phytosanitary certificate is not required for plants in-vitro with
    sterile media, e.g. sealed in a tissue culture flask and growing media.
    Is this correct?


    A: No all plants for propagation require a phytosanitary
    certificate unless an import permit instructs otherwise or the commodity
    is prohibited entry into the USA. The Phyto reflects the inspection of the
    exporting country that the plants is the shipment meet the entry
    requirements of the USA.


    Q: Are plants shipped in this manner required to enter the US through a PPQ
    inspection center?


    A: Yes

    Q: Are tubers or gemmae eligible for the Small Seeds Permit provided the
    50 count or 10 grams per taxon is not exceeded?


    A: No the small lots of seed is for seed not vegetative plant material.
    Tubers are not seed.


    Q: Or is a phytosanitary certificate required regardless?

    A: A Phytosanitary certificate is required for all propagative plant material
    and sometimes for non propagative plant material that is eligible for
    entry into the USA.

    See also this circular from APHIS that explains the obligations that a foreign shipper and importer must fulfill to legal import plants and seed to the US. A copy of this should be sent to the party exporting the plants or seed. It is available in several languages:
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_heal...-2circular.pdf
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_heal...-1circular.pdf
    If you have any questions contact APHIS:

    Contact Permit Services:
    Telephone (301) 734-0841 or (877) 770-5990 (Toll-Free Automated System); Fax (301) 734-4300; Email: Permits@aphis.usda.gov
    Last edited by Not a Number; 03-22-2014 at 09:03 PM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #30
    31drew31's Avatar
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    This is of little worry to me as a Canadian, but great post NAN. "Sticky" material IMO.

  7. #31
    sarracenia lover dionae's Avatar
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    So, in short all I need to import anything I want to is-

    PPQ 621 (CITES)
    PPQ 587
    Phytosanitary Certificates

    Anyone know how much the phyto certs are?

  8. #32
    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    varies form country to country. Back in the day (when I was filling them out for the work at the USDA but it has been over 10 years) it also depend on the value of the shipment. I remember them being about $70 ish. Again here in USA over 10 years so things may have changed. and will be dependent on what the issuing country charges...

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