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Thread: Did I ever give more info on these?

  1. #9

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    Hi Joe,

    I had M. elongatus in 1973 and raised a few. I recall 4 months incubation. The eggs were huge. I kept each pair in a 15 gallon tank. Austrolebias are the only cool water annuals I know about. Now there are all the West African species that like it cool.

    The worm food is for gut loading. Send me your address again will you and I will get it off to you when I get back from Seattle at the end of next week. Marc wants a report on its effectiveness and I am betting you'll do a careful one.

    I'd keep the kafuensis separate for safety's sake. I just don't get why they aren't hatching but kafuensis can take 5 months. If you noticed the post by Edson on Cynolebias, watch for him. He is a great breeder/collector in Brazil and is extrememly knowledgable and helpful. You might want to get to know him. I still think you should email Morenski as he is working with all the cool water Austrolebias and all forms of kafuensis.

    Bobby

  2. #10

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    Results of the hatch looks like maybe 3 or so good fry. It seems they feast on the microcritters that hatch with them or are introduced via the hatch water(I found when I left some peat from rewet Aust. nigripinnis eggs in the water for a while daphnia popped out...and even a day or two after wetting it you can often find cyclops). Definetly keeping them seperate as I just eyeballed the first kafuensis fry and it probably at least doubled in size.

    Hope to email Bob soon and see(got an AKA Roster which helps).

    I'm assuming you've not had any experience with the west African fish("jewels from Gabon"). David Sanchez actually posted on killies.com that he thought Diapterons might actually like warmer conditions. Interesting stuff. If their are any that have been in captivity long enough to be able to take my water conditions they would be worth a shot.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  3. #11

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    Hi Joe,

    I thought Diapterons were all cool water fish. The water you will have to play with and see as some fish adapt. They are suppose to be mean little guys though. I still say the Austrolebias are the best. Don't judge by that nigripinnis location as it is a bit odd.

    Bobby

  4. #12

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    Hello Bobby,

    He posted a hypothesis of sorts on www.killies.com where he said it seemed his Diaps did better when the tanks were warmer.

    I ain't too interested in getting Diapterons(don't like fish that kill each other alot or cost a fortune) but a few such as ogoense pique my interest and seem to be prolific enough to be within reach as well.

    Someone by the name of Tru has nigripinnis 'Maschwitz' up on aquabid with a photo which to me seems to be a pretty nice representation of this species. bellottii location also looks nice. A few photos seem to make bellottii appear a pleasing blue/grey color though.

    I've heard also that Simp(or is it Netamolebias...) whitei is quite cold tolerant but not as much as nigripinnis(they would probably not survive winters here). They also have very nice finnage and grow pretty big(hummm wonder what pond raised whitei would look like). Cynopoecilius melanotaenia is also said to take very cold temps but I think you mentioned somewhere that these are not particularly interesting fish. All this being said I will probably only be able to work 2 or 3 annual species at one time as at least indoors they require the most work/space of all the fish I keep. They'd probably have to be species that are easy to tell apart and would not interbreed.

    Totally off the top of my head but have you heard of anyone sorta "self sustaining" their fish? As in getting things to the point where they didn't need to purchase food? Seeing how fish in ponds need little/no feeding it seems it would be possible. Going off topic a little bit but the redworm bin has worked so well that the worm needs of the fish and a few newts(who live almost solely on worms)...based on a few calculations this bin saved me quite a bit of $$$ from the alternative of buying them in packs of 50 from the baitshop. I've been working with greenwater/daphnia and things have been going pretty well.

    And last but not least removed those kafuensis fry from the peat. Turns out their were two but boy had they grown! Must be lots of microcritters in the peat for them to eat as their tummies were fat and they were almost the same size as the fry from the first wetting(makes sense as this one turned up after I thought they had all died).

    ~Joseph
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

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