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Thread: Do my fish have Ick?

  1. #17
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    It says that one treatment is usually all it takes. But it says USUALLY so, maybe I should use it again since not all of the spots are gone. I will do it again now. Thanks for the link, it was really helpful!
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  2. #18
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    One fish took a turn for the worse over night. She has more white spots now and didn't eat this morning Usually they go crazy for food, and three of them did, but the fourth was just blah
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  3. #19
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Now it looks like their fins are shedding! I still have all four, but one is still not doing well. Anybody have any ideas as to why their fins are shedding?
    Great Googly Moogly!

    Beware of the yellow snow!

  4. #20
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    Trapper,

    If you're having problems with your fish and their fins are shedding, do you mean they look like they're losing their fins? Are they tattered on the edges? Any number of things could be causing ragged fins: they could be nipping at each other (tiger barbs are notorious for this), it could be a bacterial infection, or it could be ammonia burn. I'm not sure if you understood the nitrogen cycle or not, but here's a VERY simplified explanation:

    Fish release waste into the water and it's full of ammonia. Ammonia is bad for fish, as in toxic. There are a variety of different kinds of bacteria that convert the ammonia into nitrite which is highly toxic to fish as well. Different types of bacteria then convert the nitrite into nitrate, which isn't as toxic but still not good for the fish. You have to let your tank cycle or give the bacteria time to grow. The bacteria won't grow without a food souce, ammonia, so they won't start growing until you introduce fish to the aquarium. So what happens is you put in fish, ammonia spikes, bacteria start growing, the ammonia drops, the nitrite spikes, bacteria start growing, the nitrite drops, and the nitrate starts to go up. Bacteria don't spontaneously generate, and the bacteria that break down all the ammonia and nitrite don't float around in the water...they attach to solid surfaces. If you bring in some gravel or old filter media from an established aquarium, that will bring the bacteria in and speed up the process. You can also buy products like Cycle or Biospira to help introduce the bacteria as well. Your tank has to go through a nitrogen cycle.

    I'd politely disagree with not using RO water for fish. I used RO water in my discus tanks for years, but DO NOT use straight RO water. RO water has no minerals in it, it's close to being pure. The fish NEED minerals in the water. If you do use RO water, there are products (something like RO Right) that you can buy and add then necessary minerals back to the water. If you do that, feel free to use RO or distilled water. If not, stay away from using it.

    As far as the pH stuff, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Many of those additives people use for adjusting pH are not good. They lower the pH temporarily, and then it shoots back up. The constant up and down of pH is extremely stressful on the fish and can send them into shock and they could die. If the pH is a little high or a little low, that's okay for most fish (including tiger barbs). The best bet is to just leave it be and they'll be fine I would think.

    If you're still worried about not meeting their specific water requirements, then maybe shift how you're looking at it. Rather than match your water to the fish, match the fish to your water. If Florida is sitting on a bed of limestone, your water as you can see has a high pH and is probably pretty hard. That's ideal water conditions for many Rift Lake African Cichlids, and then you wouldn't have to worry much about the water, but cichlids come with their own issues.

  5. #21
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Thanks for that info. So basically, just let it be and in a few weeks the tank should be good, right?

    Yes the fish do nip at each other, but the fins are still there, but it looks like there is a layer of "skin" hanging off. I read on a website that I should get more Barbs, because the more there are, they will stop nipping at each other. I didn't want to add more fish because of the Ick, because then I would just be wasting my money. And also because it said I should start off with just a few fish to start the cycle. Once the tank goes through it's cycle, then I could add more.

    One of my fish just died It was the one that had the most spots and the fins were "shedding". The other three look a lot healthier. I wasn't suprised that one died. It really wasn't doing well.

    Ok, so am I right when I think that I just have to let my tank be? I know I will lose fish to this, but that's part of it right? How long does it usually take for a 10 gallon to cycle? Few weeks? Thanks again for everyone's help.
    Great Googly Moogly!

    Beware of the yellow snow!

  6. #22
    wmgorum's Avatar
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    I wouldn't add any more fish right now. Typically, I put in one or two small fish to cycle a 10 gallon aquarium... typical rule of thumb for stocking a tank is 1 inch of fish to a gallon of water. Your aquarium doesn't have 10 gallons of water in it. Gravel, decorations, etc., are going to displace some of the volume of water. Keep this in mind when you're using any kind of chemicals or medications in your tank. Also keep in mind that 10 one inch tiger barbs don't have anywhere to the same kind of body mass as a 10 inch oscar. You wouldn't want a 10 inch oscar in a 10 gallon tank.

    I give my tanks about 6 weeks to cycle. You don't want to put in say two tiger barbs, let it cycle for 6 weeks and then hit it with 7 more because the bacteria won't be able to handle such an increase in the bioload. I usually put in two, wait 6 weeks or so, put in two more, wait week or two, put in two more, wait a week or two, etc.

    Tiger barbs are nippy little fish and yes they do better in a group. You said something previously about their colors changing. A fish's colors will change depending on their mood, their health, the color of the substrate beneath them (they tend to bleach out of a light colored substrate trying to blend). The greenish tint to their bars, I wouldn't worry much about. There's actually a color mutation of tiger barb called a "green tiger barb" and they really don't have bars. Most of their body is a dark color and when the light reflects off of it, they look green. I would assume it's from an abundance of the same pigment that makes up their bars, so I wouldn't be surprised to see green bars sometimes on a tiger barb depending on the light.

  7. #23
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Thanks again wmgorum Usually their stripes are a nice black, but it does goes green sometimes. I didn't think about not having 10 gallons of water in my tank, due to decorations and gravel! That's a great point, thanks for that too! Ok, so I've had my tank for 3 weeks this Saturday, but only have had fish for 2 weeks, this Saturday. So I have about another month before things should be alright. If things are looking good, I will slowly add more fish. I'm still doing the Ick treatment, it will be 7 days this Saturday for that. I keep doing 25% water changes before I put in the treatment. I hope no more fish die, but only time will tell. Thanks again!
    Great Googly Moogly!

    Beware of the yellow snow!

  8. #24
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Trapper,

    this is how the "learning cycle" generally goes when it comes to all the PH test kits and the various drops and all that.

    Step 1.
    buy a new tank and get every test kit under the sun, test water religiously and fret and worry over the results..add lots of drops to the water.

    Step 2.
    after a few weeks, realize it all means nothing and stop using all that stuff.
    Go onto decades of sucessful fish keeping and never touch a test kit ever again.

    and you are right, you already know more than the people at the fish store..
    dont listen to anything else they say.

    your recent aquarium problems are the result of two things.

    1. as you already know, the tank wasnt properly cycled.

    2. your tank is far too small to ever be really stable.

    IMO, 10-gallon tanks shouldnt even be sold..they are useless..the amount of water is FAR too small to ever be a stable environment...(and goldfish bowls should be illegal.)

    I would consider a 29 gallon tank to be the minimum practical size.

    10-gallon tanks CAN work..but you will have to clean and fuss with them much more than larger tanks, and you shouldnt have anything more than 4 tetra-sized fish in them..

    Step 3.
    after being frustrated with the 10-gallon tank for a few months, the new tropical fish enthusiast moves the fish into a 29 gallon or 55 gallon tank, and the 10-gallon goes into storage in the basement, never to be used again!

    The fish and the fish keeper live happily ever after.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    (and I know all about those three steps from personal experience!

    http://www.geocities.com/scottychaos/aquapage.htm

    (sorry about the Geocities..I will probably never get around to moving that webpage..)

    Scot

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