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Thread: What is your favorite fresh water fish?

  1. #25
    Lidocaine
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    Some of my favorite fish I ever had were:

    Black Piranah
    Red Snakehead
    Alligator Gar

    It is amazing to wath those fish eat other fish with the occasional small mouse.

  2. #26

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    wow you kept an alligator gar, I have one too. They are so bueatiful, with their slim slender body. I had mine in a 10 gallon, before it started outgrowing it, so Its in a 55, its going to outgrow it quickly. And I don't want to put it in my 125 with my tropicals =(. He'll eat them up. I don't know what to do with him.

  3. #27

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    Sphaerichthys osphromenoides: chocolate gourami. The absolute king of fish, IMO.

    I don't like albino fish, hybrid fish, community tanks, or color strains of any sort (so most discus are out the window...only naturals, please). I do biotopes and species tanks...and that's about it.

  4. #28

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    I'm leaning toward your preferences, skylsdale. Problem is, if i don't keep a community tank, i don't have many options. Post some pics of your biotopes!
    There's no 'a' in perlite.

    My Growlist
    NECPS.org - New England CP growers unite!

  5. #29

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    Sorry D, I don't currently have any biotope tanks set up. I took them all down in order to "simplify" things...and currently just have a 20 gal nano reef up and running.

    I think my preferences come down to why I keep aquaria. I don't consider tanks and fish as "pets" whereas many people do. I don't name my fish. I like to see animals in their natural habitat--this goes beyond taller plants along the back and corners, shorter ones up front, and a stylish piece of driftwood somewhere. I want to replicate their natural habitat as closely as possible, and then see how they fit in and interact with that habitat. I don't want a tank with fish--I want a sliver of that specific habitat. Make sense? You see so many apistos kept in heavily planted tanks, when in the wild they are usually found in tiny blackwater streams under the forest canopy, with very little aquatic vegetation. Their realm is that of copious leaf litter that falls from the canopy above. Yes, they look nice in a tank filled with lush green plants...but come into their own in a blackwater setup, where their colors shimmer in the tannin rich water and they hunt, spawn, and take shelter among a generous amont of leaf litter. You then begin to see how this fish interacts with its environment, rather than just having something "pretty" to look at. To me, their natural habitat and relationship with it is MUCH more beautiful than any sterile landscape Amano could devise. Discus live among the submerged branches of shrubs and dead trees in often murky water. It's a pretty desolate contrast to the aquatic jungles most people choose to keep them in. In a mangle of branches you can begin to understand the vertical striping of wild strains of discuss--it helps to throw off the perception of predators, much like a zebra's stripes.

    Anyway, there's a little preface for any future posts I may contribute.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Problem is, if i don't keep a community tank, i don't have many options.
    What do you mean by that? There are TONS of options out there as far as biotope tanks you can do, they just usually aren't laid out for people to follow. It entails doing a little research and gathering info and photos from different sources, often outside the realm of aquaria. If you need som help, just let me know--I've done quite a bit of reading on quite a few environment and can pass along some suggestions if you want. Some of the tanks I have done are:

    --SE asian stream (for cyprinids). Tank was half full with boulders sticking out of the water and a few powerheads for flow throughout the tank. It was so simple, yet one of my favorites.
    --SE asian stillwater. Kept the chocolate gouramies in here. Great tank.
    --Malawi boulder field. Crammed this tank full of rock and kept some C. labidichromis.
    --S. American blackwater stream with a pair of Apistogramma panduro. Mostly sand and tangles of branches.
    --Australian rocky/sandy riverbed. Had a school of generic rainbowfish in here.

  6. #30

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    Hi Skylsdale,

    Did you get your Chocolates to breed? Have you ever seen some of the other species of Chocolates? They are even prettier!

    Bobby

  7. #31

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    Did you get your Chocolates to breed?
    No, but I didn't have the proper setup to do this with (e.g. an RO/DI unit). I didn't have the funds for one, either, and even tried collecting rainwater to use in the tank, which was a huge pain. Actually, so little is actually known about this fish (a whole bunch of wive's tails abound on the internet from what I've seen). This fish is classically labeled as shy and frequently bullied by other fish, which it is. However, no one ever mentions (and may not even know) that this fish is EXTREMELY violent towards its own kind. I had a nice group of them in a 20L...and over a few weeks, watched the top fish systematically kill those below him in the heirarchy. There is actually a good article on their behavior in the latest issue of Tropical Fish Hobbyist, and the second part will be out next month. The author has actual experience with this fish, and attests to its violent nature toward its own kind. Many individuals need to be crammed into a tank that is PACKED full of hiding places and wood. It's not what most people would consider a show tank...but I love it anyway. \

    But back to your question: I never got them to breed, but hope to some day. I have contacted a few people overseas who have, but I think places like the Netherlands and Germany just have a magic wand they wave over the tank to get their fish to breed...and they're just keeping it a secret.

    Have you ever seen some of the other species of Chocolates? They are even prettier!

    Personally, I wouldn't go that far. I don't base "pretty" by the brightness and number of colors on a fish. I'll take S. osphro osphro over Valliant's or any of the others any day.

  8. #32

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    Hi,

    I've seen one brooding female come in with a shipment once. I almost picked her up to raise a tank bred line but I didn't feel like hatching baby brine at the time. The man who took her said she spit out 29 fry. He lost them. I also once saw a shipment with large adults where the males had the deep red borders on their caudal fin. There are many wonderful old articles on breeding Chocolates dating back to the early 1950's in The Aquarium Journal and the Aquarium Magazine. I agree, Chocolates are extrememly aggressive. I liked the article in TFH and am looking forward to part II. Like many small fish they seem to be a species that requires large tanks. I learned that with some of my killies, particularly Gnatholebias zonatus and hoignei. You might check out <TheFishWizards.com>. Tony is an old friend and brings in rare Anabantids, particularly Licorice gouramis and some Chocolates. You might also try the British Anabantoid Association. It is a very good group of breeders. I am hoping to get a fascinating little gourami Malpulutta kretseri soon. It too is a leaf litter fish but from Sri Lanka. A friend has it in NYC and he had to get it from the Europeans. I think the European secret with hard to breed fish is just that more of their breeders try harder for a longer time than do ours.

    Bobby

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