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Thread: total newbie wanting to

  1. #9

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    Also would i have to buy a nitrate/temperature/ammonia/etc tester?
    that sounds expensive!!!

    also i like guppies, i see some nice red/blue/yellow tailed ones for sale in markets. The problem is they breed alot(we had a pond once) and i might not have space, what do you think?
    A lady went into a grocery store and looked into the turket section. She needed a bigger one for her family, so she asks the stock boy: \"Do these turkeys get any bigger?\"

    The stock boy replied: \"No ma'am, they're dead\"

    Msn/email - wezx1@hotmail.com

  2. #10
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    well, your sound like your doing your reading! adding to much O2 will lower the CO2 by disturbing the surface of the water, but the two are NOT mutually exclusive. I would not even mess with an air pump or an Air Stone.

    ABOUT UNDERGRAVEL FILTERS: imagine is your home had a vacuum surface under the carpet, and whenever you made a mess, it would just suck down under the carpet. Where does all that stuff go? NO WHERE! It stays there and breaks down, and creates a nasty mulm under the filter plate. To clean it, you have to use a water change siphon with a grate over it, and disturb the gravel bed, sucking it all out and throwing it out with your water changes. In my opinion, the only benefit of an undergravel filter is concentrating the waste in one place for you. You want to grow plants, you don't want an undergravel filter. The very nature of disturbing the gravel bed is bad for your plants, your disturbing their roots.

    OH, and you don't want to mix an apple snail and plants, your plants will quickly become breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

    EMPEROR POWER FILTERS: they probably have something similar in singapor... here is a link to what they look like...

    LINK

    If you watch the rotating image in the upper right for a few seconds, you will see one where the lid is slightly raised, and there is a pleated wheel under it, that is the BIO-Wheel, and these are great inventions, they provide TONS of bio-filtration.

    I would reccomend you go fish only first, with some water sprite, and as much light as you can. Keep it simple, and you will learn from it, and just don'e ever get overly ambitious... you will do great!
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    You can always spread the wealth around to others; get them involved with fish. If I remember correctly, plants absorb CO2 by day through photosythesis and revers the process at night. CO2 imbalance due to too many plants never came up as an issue. With regard to the nitrogen cycle, you can purchase a test kit; it wouldn't hurt. I wouldn't mess around with chemicals to speed up the process. It isn't necessary. Just set up ypur aquarium with the usual hardlines: gravel, thermometer, heater, filter, pump, light... Add the water and let the tank filter for a couple days. Add a plant. Add a fish - cheap one that can be sacrificed - like a FEEDER guppy. Now we can talk about the nitrogen cycle. The guppy will produce waste products - namely ammonia. You may notice that your tank clouds up. Don't worry. Nitrosomonas bacteria beaks down harmful ammonia to also harmful nitrite. Then, as the ammomia concentrations go down, the nitrite level goes up. Nitrobacter bacteria breaks down the nitrites into much safer nitrate. When all this occurs it is truly safe to introduce more fish. This process takes a few weeks and it also takes place on the filter media, for the most part. A dirty sponge filter or whatever is a GOOD thing. A brand new filter looks nice but it is not "seasoned." That is, it hasn't gone through the nitrogen cycle. A dirty and full filter; that is, clogged, is a filter that isn't working. It needs to be squeeezed out in the sink. I learned this the hard way. I also learned that using "aged water" on a new filter is anice temporary fix - but a really bad idea. It has no "good" bacteria, meaning it hasn't gone through the cycle. Don't try to rush the process. Be patient. Go slowly. Add fish slowly. When I was a kid I had a 5.5 gallon tank with a cheap incandescent light on top. In it I placed a few broken, leftover pieces of water sprite. they floated. After several weeks those "pieces" grew and grew and grew - above the water line. An airstone is nice to have I don't see any reason to get a smaller or larger one. Just get a filter going, even a small, cheap sponge filter and let the bacteria deal with the toxins produced by animal waste products. Have fun!

  4. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (wezx @ Jan. 01 2004,05:35)]Also would i have to buy a nitrate/temperature/ammonia/etc tester?
    that sounds expensive!!!

    also i like guppies, i see some nice red/blue/yellow tailed ones for sale in markets. The problem is they breed alot(we had a pond once) and i might not have space, what do you think?
    Test kits aren't expensive, you can get Aquarium Phamaceuticls master test kit for 20 dollars and it has pH-high range pH-Ammonia-nitrite-GH-KH. Really, you can still put some snails with plants, such as Spike-topped apple snails (Pomacea bridgesii). It's important to note though, that you will need to feed snails sinking wafers or lettuce in order to keep them alive. They aren't garbage cans, and they aren't all that great at cleaning, so you should keep them because their interesting, not to clean your tank. Get some gohst shrimp too. Feel free to ask me any other questions you have about freshwater inverts, I perfer them to fish. You need to visit http://www.applesnail.net

  5. #13
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    I guess I have to defer to your judgement on snails, I have never had an apple not devour my plants, and I have tried a few, though I don't know what specific ones they were.

    The best choices for snails in a planted tank (bar none) is the malaysian trumpet snail.

    For algae control, a Siamese Algae eater, will eat anything, even black hair algae (ick).
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  6. #14

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    thanks for the replys everyone! Im learning fast!

    today i dropped by a small aquarium shop. I saw a filter called "bio filter". It looks like an external filter with a tube sticking in the water. It looked quite like the emperor filter. It is 200 liters per hour (what does that ,mean?) and it is biological, chemical and mechenical filter (what does that mean?)
    best of all it's only S$15!!!
    is that ok for my 10 (OR 20?SEE 2 POSTS DOWN)gallon tank?

    also what's a "spone filter"?
    does algae grow fast? will a Siamese algae eater handle a 10 gallon tank with quite strong light?

    just to confirm, is a standard 2ft(24") tank 10gallon?

    thanks!!!!!
    A lady went into a grocery store and looked into the turket section. She needed a bigger one for her family, so she asks the stock boy: \"Do these turkeys get any bigger?\"

    The stock boy replied: \"No ma'am, they're dead\"

    Msn/email - wezx1@hotmail.com

  7. #15

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    Oh, another note - if you get live plants, make sure to wash and check them carefully. They often come with some annoying snails (don't know the name) but they are a pest. It took me 2 months to get rid of them by crushing them when I saw them! The snail's eggs look like clear and white jelly.

    Ram has a good suggestion to have an algae eater (Crossocheilus siamensis) in the tank. Another good one is a catfish called (otocinclus afinis) which will stay very small and is great for a 10 gallon. You'll likely need two, but I like fish in pairs to watch them interact.

    New tanks are so exciting! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    A flytrap ate my homework!
    -Michelle

  8. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (wezx @ Jan. 02 2004,02:54)]thanks for the replys everyone! Im learning fast!

    today i dropped by a small aquarium shop. I saw a filter called "bio filter". It looks like an external filter with a tube sticking in the water. It looked quite like the emperor filter. It is 200 liters per hour (what does that ,mean?) and it is biological, chemical and mechenical filter (what does that mean?)
    best of all it's only S$15!!!
    is that ok for my 10 gallon tank?

    also what's a "spone filter"?
    does algae grow fast? will a Siamese algae eater handle a 10 gallon tank with quite strong light?

    just to confirm, is a standard 2ft(24") tank 10gallon?

    thanks!!!!!
    Tengallon tanks are 20'' long, 10'' wide. The tank you mentioned would be a twenty gallon. Sponge filters use air to pull water through a sponge.
    RamPuppy, there are about 9 genera in apple snails. Chances are you always get the wrong species. If its blue, its the type you want.

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