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Thread: Ivory montezumae update pics

  1. #9

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    I've had fairy shrimp (daphina) pop up in the water meter in my yard lol

  2. #10

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    Hi Spec and Nflytrap,

    Spec, where did you find Ariel's picture of the fallax? Ariel Is a good friend of mine. We trade fish. I sent him a bunch of Gnatholebias zonatus and Gn. hoignei last year as well as some Nothobranchius symoensi and he sent me some rare Nanochromis dimidiatus -- a West African dwarf cichlid related to kribensis. He is currently translating a new german book on West African dwarf cichlids by the world's leading authority on them. It will be fantastic. Nathan on the Forums here may know Ariel as they both go to the Boston Aquariium Society. Did you see the fallax pics at the <killifish of west africa> site too?

    I bet fairy shrimp are going extinct as they need those seasonal ponds that always get lost in surburbia. My friend's are from Brazil and an aquartist there raises them for food.

    There is a species of paradise fish I have been trying to get for 2 years that would live year round in your pond. It is Mac. ocellatus (chinensis). It comes from China and actually needs a cold period to do well year after year. It is a gorgeous fish and less aggressive than regular paradise fish. It has a round tail and in breeding colors the male is half black and half orange. Some Europeans raise them year round outside. I thought I had found them in Japan but the man cheated me on our trade. I sent; he did not.

    Nezzies are mountain swordtails so they are pretty cold tolerant.

    Bobby

  3. #11

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    Then again, arent the monties also mountain swordtails? Maybe a bit lower, which would mean i'd have to bring them all in for the winter. Now for an excuse to get rid of a few feeder goldfish...



    Are you talking about M. concolor? I've seen auctions from one guy running on Ebay. They look pretty much like dull normals in his pic though.

    BTW, for the monties, have you evered given them wafers of any sort? They steal sera catfish chips from my BN pleco(s), and really enjoy them. Best of all, the female has enough time to come out and start stuffing her face(unlike with pellets, which dissapear quickly). I'm thinking Hikari sinking or algae wafers would fit this bill perfectly and allow the pair to eat at night. Im hoping they will breed soon.

    Spec: Fairy shrimp and Daphnia are 2 different organisms. The same thing happened to me in my ponds.


    Thanks for the info!
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  4. #12

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    Hi Nflytrap,

    I think nezzies do come from further up the mountains than monties. I have 2 friends here who have kept them outside year round and we freeze here at night at times.

    Oh, yes, the monties like wafers. I gave them algae wafers and Marineland's chunky food. I just ordered a bunch of new foods to try: veggies flakes, earthworm flakes, krill pellets, guppy micropellets, brine shrimp flakes, low heat cooked flakes and mysis flakes. We'll see.

    Concolor is the Black Paradise and it looks dull until full grown and breeding and then the males get a lovely black body with white and red edging and huge fins. They like it warm as they are from Vietnam. Ocellatus or chinensis is a cold water paradise fish species and quite unique looking. I've wanted it for 30 years.

    2 of my angel pairs decided to spawn today. First for each. A pair of albinos and a pair of pearl scale marbles. My koi veils have yet to pair up. I use them to keep my livebearer fry in check now and its working. I culled monties and mollies today down to about 35 of each. Plus I put my big black sailfin molly males in with a batch of lyretail and veiltail mollies I am raising to get some hybrid vigor going in the fancies. The sailfins are wild blacks from Florida swamps crossed with wild petenensis sailfin mollies from Guatemala and are wonderful strong big colorful fish. I'm still hoping to get wild petenensis and the even bigger and prettier wild velifera sailfins from the Yucatan soon. They make domestic mollies look like feeder fish!

    Bobby

  5. #13

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    Arrow

    Found the pic on google [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

  6. #14

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    Okay, I used to think those two were just synonyms. M. concolor is hard enough to find! Wanting them for 30 years Man! And I thought 2 years for H. formosa and 1 year for montys was bad1(both since learning about them)...

    The mollies sounds good. IMHO, I think that most fancy mollies(even with reasonably tall sails) are ugly. The wild ones are a different story though. As a matter a fact, non aquarists seem to think the same way. In one tank of young albino lyretail mollies, I spotted a wildtype lyretail male. I pointed the tank out to my dad. He didn't see it and told me that"Those fish are pretty bland looking." I then point out it and 2 large WT males in a tank next to it out him him...which he liked much better. So much for albinos. Even though I've enver owned mollies, I really like the looks of wild P. latipanna. Never seen the other 2 species you're talking about. I hear tell that if you cross Gulf Coast P. latipanna to Florida ones, they show hybrid vigour. In your interests of improving fancy mollies, it would be interesting to make such a cross and then cross the results into a fancy strain.

    If you ever get ahold of Velifera, keep thme pure and Im sure you will have a long waiting list. I swear whenever the talk of wild mollies comes up someone mentions Velifera. Its the same as concolor(and to some extent montezumae, though these Wt livebearers don't seem to be discussed amuch on normal fish forums compared to, say, goodeids or Endlers). I guess I could say they are aquarium hobby legends which most hobbyists know only my the name, and a picture.

    When you try the new foods with the monties...let me know what they think!

    Thanks!
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  7. #15

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    Hi Nflytrap,

    Tell people to ask their lfs to order from 5D fish farm in Florida. They raise nice black paradise (concolor) and have for 20 years. Dolphin imports them too from the Far East. Ocellatus (chinensis) disappeared from the USA hobby after China went to the Commies in 1949 plus people didn't realize they needed a cold period to do well. The Europeans got it again in the 80's. I bet it is here somewhere but I can't find it. I just got another fish I wanted for 30 years -- Malpuluta kretseri, a tiny gourami from Sri Lanka. I just hope I can breed it. It's difficult.

    I had wild velifera in the 1970's. They are gorgeous. The body of the male is all blue scales with the huge cup shaped dorsal and the red and blue tail. They are stunning when showing off. I also had petenensis in the 70's. The male has a long low sailfin dorsal and a tiny black sword on the caudal. Latipinna is native all over my area and I crossed the veil and lyretails with a wild male latipinna so most of the fry are green, black spotted and almost black. They are going to be nice fish already but I am betting the wild cross males from Florida will further improve them even more.

    Most domestic sailfins are now based on velifera and not latipinna as they were from the 1920's-1970's. The Far East started using velifera in the 70's with the Gold Sailfins (albino velifera maybe crossed to albino latipinna) and now most mollies are velifera based but impure. Velifera is a hardier fish than latipinna and has a naturally bigger sailfin.

    I will keep the velifera pure as I love wild mollies. I have 2 friends who want it too, as well as petenensis. Mollies are hard to keep. They require big tanks -- like cichlids -- with big 80% water changes 1-2 times a week and tons of food as they are pigs. To get the big size males and big sails you have to pamper the fish. In old water mollies get sick -- white bacteria and shimmies. They need at least 2 big meals a day -- 4-6 are better. They do not need salt but need great strong filtration. They need veggies but they also need protein too. With all livebearers, you need to cull out the early developing males so they won't breed. The best and biggest males develop slowly. Best to isolate females too so you can breed a virgin female to a big late developing male. Mollies are strong, active, exciting fish to keep. I don't know why they are so ignored in the livebearer hobby.

    The veil mollies I have are nothing compared to the old strain that existed from 1965-1990. They looked like male delta tail guppies only huge. All the fins were extended like on veil angels. The tails could be 4 inches wide and 4 inches long and the bodies were big enough to support them. Today's veils are a new mutation from the Far East and only the tail is enlarged -- more like a veil tail guppy. Plus the male has a long deformed gonopodium like in lyretail swords -- unlike the old strain -- so you can only breed females to regular males. It's sad that people let the old strain go but they did.

    Bobby

  8. #16

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    wow!! 30 years?! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif[/img]

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