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Thread: Updates on the ivory montys

  1. #9

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    Maybe put the female in one of those net brooder things inside the tank next time?

  2. #10

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    Pretty sure that would only make it worse. Being trapped in the netbrooder is very stressful and the female will usually make frantic attemps to escape. Many sites say that this often causes premature births.


    I will be observing the tank carefully for any more signs of fry.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  3. #11

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    HI Nflytrap,


    The holes may be from the snails. Ramshorns are not bad but do nibble, plus stem plants always have ugly bottom leaves without CO2 injection. I hope the fry absorbed their yoke sacs and are now swimming. Until the tank gets well populated, monties are not bad fry eaters. Hang in there, you'll get fry.

    Bobby

  4. #12

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    Spotted one fry swimming in the water column today. I think it still had a yoke sack, otherwise it found a LOT of goodies in my tank! Maybe so, cause I've actually seen cyclops darting around in the java moss on the left side of the tank where few fish go.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  5. #13

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    Just looked up Gnatholebias. Very impressive! Doesn't look liek a good starter killie though...LOL


    Do you own any of the cynolebias species? I heard some of them can tolerate cooler temps(one that comesinto mind is C. nigripinnis and C. bellotii). Annual killies sound very interesting...esp how they spawn. Besides aplocheilus, jordanellae, and lucania goodei, i have no experience with killifish. The only one I bred and raised fry from was the A. lineatus. My male American Flagfish was brutally murdered by the female(wel...thats the best suspect) and I only have one male lucania goodei(bluefin killifish).
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  6. #14

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    Bobby: Well...right now at LEAST 10 fry are swimming around in this tank. I took the count from the ones swimming in the water-who knows how many are swimming on the edges of the java moss foreground(btw, though I have said it already, that portion you gave was very generous...still havent used it all and it covers half the foreground)! They have been eating frozen BBs...along with the adults. I hope to get a hatchery made and get some eggs. I have seen cyclopeeze at my LFS, so I may also give that a try.

    As for the "juvies" they are doing quite well. both females are now fat and carrying a load of fry. I hope that doesn't stop them from growing larger though! In the future, I hope to do as you suggested and seperate young females and grow the to full size before allowing them to mate. But I doubt that ever happens in the wild.

    The young males now have the first row of dashes on there dorsals, which are now higher than the young females. It is still hard to believe the robust looking young will soon take the form of the adult male in the tank. They now pose stiff competition for the adult male, and I have seen them mate with the young females. Its funny how hard the male works to keep that from happening. Should one of the young males raise his dorsal fin and start strutting anywhere in his field of view, he will raise his and chase the male for about a foot before returning to his business.

    I managed to remove one of the culls, and decided to do an hardiness test. My ten gallon fry tank currently has live food in the form of little(prolly 2 week old) bullfrog tadpoles. The hets enjoy attacking them and tearing them up like little piranhas. The little swordtail survived and did quite well in this rather dirty tank for 2 days before I decided to feed him to one of my firebelly newts. The other one is too smart. The branches and dense planting prevent me from netting anywhere other than the very front of the tank.

    If I get a good number of fry, I will try some in the pond. I might also put a young male in there too.

    Thanks for all the help! I think you have managed to set up yet another colony of these wonderful fish.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  7. #15

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    Hi Nflytrap,

    This is great news. With any luck the next batch won't be too long and in a few months you will know the fun of overpopulation. All my little monties are sexed out too and looking good. I'm especially excited by a couple of particularly big nezzie males developing -- very nice.

    The Velifera mollies are doing great and eat like pigs. They are so much thicker than domestic mollies and the long dorsal fin base is very evident. Hopefully the petenensis will come next week.

    I sent a friend some Phalloceros and all arrived well, so hopefully that will become a colony.

    Gnatholebias are easy to keep and breed but the peat is difficult to incubate as it needs a constant 80F for 5 months plus you need to wet it for an hour at 4 months and then redry and hatch at 5 months and at 6 months. Eggs can take 9 months to hatch. Plus they have horrible sex ratios. My 15 fry look to be 13 males and 2 females -- ugh! They are a big gorgeous peaceful fish though that just love fruit flies!

    I have Simpsonichthys whitei right now which was a Cynolebias for 50 years. It is from Brazil and this is a new population a friend collected last year. The breeders are F1's. I hope they are prolific as usual and I should have 100's in 2 months! Whitei is a great beginner's annual. They are a beauty.

    I also have what was once called Cynolebias lacortei and is now in a new genus something like Macroara or the like. It is a beauty and very weird looking -- look it up on the South American Annual site or cynolebias group on Yahoo. It is named after my old friend and the world's greatest breeder of all kinds of tropical fish Rosario LaCorte. Nemobrycon lacortei is also named for him -- the Rainbow Emperor Tetra, a real gem. Emperor Tets are great plant tank fish.

    Nigripinnis and bellottii can take near freezing weather as they come from Argentina. They like temperatures in the 50's and 60's part of the year but breed better in the 70's. They need to be hatched in cool water and not raised too warm. They have been collected from iced over ponds in Argentina. There is no prettier fish than a good male nigripinnis. Stunning. Like stars on a dark night.

    Read the Beginner's Guide on the AKA webpage for a good intro to killie keeping.

    Boy you should see the F. fallax now. Some of the males are stunning and 2 orange males did appear among all the yellows. I also cured the other batch of velvet but lost the plants in the tank from all the salt.

    I'm getting some new young Scriptoaphyosemion (Roloffia) "calabarica" killies as the pairs I had refused to breed. Once a month the females would just dump their eggs unfertilized in a big clump -- very strange behavior for killies. The females hated the males and the males gave up chasing them. I have never seen this in almost 40 years of killie keeping.

    My Malpulutta kretseri gouramis refuse to breed. They are a very very very shy species but quite delicately beautiful. I don't know the problem still working on it.

    Glad the java moss did so well. You have mean Hets! I'd leave 3-4 male swords in the tank and put the rest outside to see. Of course catching them will be a female.

    Bobby

  8. #16

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    female should be "problem" LOL

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