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Thread: Updates on the ivory montys

  1. #25

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    All but 2 of the bluespots have been removed. The last two should be cake but I'm waiting now as the fish seem to have stressed out over having the net in the tank and me moving stuff around.

    The young females are looking plump again too.
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    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

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  2. #26

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    Hi Nflytrap,

    How the monties? Females getting plumper? All of my girls are getting fat. I took the angels out so the next 2 batches of fry should make it.

    The young males do look like they have less black than the older ones -- interesting.

    The velifera mollies are growing great. They are thick. Some males are sexing out at 3 inches. These are going to be nice fish.

    The petenensis are growing too but are longer and thinner. I only had 14 survive the transit so we shall see. One has a short spine so its out. Can't wait to see the swords develop.

    My zonatus sexed out to 7 pairs but 2 females are belly sliders. They are gorgeous as always. Green/blue bodies with burnt orange patterning and huge fins with an orange anal fin like a male Betta splendens and streamers off the top rays of the caudal -- too fine. They are trying to dive into the gravel to breed.

    I sold off all the fallax except breeding stock. I got $150 worth of supplies for them.

    The Nothobranchius kafuensis Nazhilia sexed out to 2 males and 5 females and are very nice.

    The kretseri still refuse to do anything even at 82F. Ugh. One pair from this batch spawned for a friend and he got 20 fry.

    My female gold marble pearl angel has pop eye --ugh.

    I have a black male latipinna x petenensis molly that is going to be huge. He is 4 inches and just developing. I say he will be 5 inches when he is through.

    I have some eggs to hatch next month so I am hoping -- M. lacortei, F. arnoldi and N. kafuensis Mambova -- good stuff.

    Well, that's all. Talk later.

    Bobby

  3. #27
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    Yup, the females are getting plump again. I think the younger females may be faster than the older one as far as broods go. The males have grown large enough that some can be confused with the full grown male in the tank. 2 females havent grown to my knowledge, but looking at them every day you couldn't tell. For the coloration, I think you may be right about them losing color, but since these are my first I can't tell.

    The bluespots, btw, didn't seem to mind the move. The day after they were moved into a seperate ten gallon crammed with the java moss(which you sent enough for the foreground and now for this tank) and fern-the male took up his spawning colors. He was a deep purple black(seller describes it as indigo, but i'm not good with colors) and while flaring to the females was almost as dark as a piece of coal. His body gave off an nice purple shine, while the white spots were tinted with ice blue. The action seems to have fallen off...so perhaps I will get eggs next year.

    BTw, I'm not sure if it was from your daphnia or from the ones I myself collected almost a year ago, but one of the critter keepers containing blackworms suddenly sprouted a daphnia culuture! I picked up a small sweaterbox at the dollar store to set up another daphnia culture-now I have two. Looks like all the fish may enjoy some good munchies.

    Bad news on the grindals-they seem to have dissapeared. Everything was going great, and soon I was seeing the seething mass of worms attacking shrimp pellets and cheerios that everyone describes. Then, right when I was about ready to harvest them, they all dissapeared! Digging through the substrate revealed only a few worms...which seem to have dissapeared by now too. I also discovered 2 millipedes in the dirt with them. I'm unsure of whether or not these millipedes consumed the grindals...but I can't think of any other explanation.

    For the kretseri, how'd your friend manage it?

    All, this killie talk is making me albit interested in killifish to say the least. I've only kept aplocheilus and right now a single bluefin killifish(I pulled a reverse trio from a ghost shrimp feeder tank, but I killed the female in a preventable accident [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img])

    Whats your method for all those nothos? There seem to be as many techniques as people...lol

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]

    Yup, the females are getting plump again. I think the younger females may be faster than the older one as far as broods go. The males have grown large enough that some can be confused with the full grown male in the tank. 2 females havent grown to my knowledge, but looking at them every day you couldn't tell. For the coloration, I think you may be right about them losing color, but since these are my first I can't tell.
    Yeah, we'll just have to see if the black expands with aging but it looks less. All my girls are plump -- 8 of them. I lost another one to belly blow out -- ugh. I think I have a young male who will be bulkier than the rest body wise.

    A friend is going to send me some of my old plain monty strain back next month. I like how big they get -- 1-2 inches larger than the spotted in the biggest fish!

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    The bluespots, btw, didn't seem to mind the move. The day after they were moved into a seperate ten gallon crammed with the java moss(which you sent enough for the foreground and now for this tank) and fern-the male took up his spawning colors. He was a deep purple black(seller describes it as indigo, but i'm not good with colors) and while flaring to the females was almost as dark as a piece of coal. His body gave off an nice purple shine, while the white spots were tinted with ice blue. The action seems to have fallen off...so perhaps I will get eggs next year.
    That does sound like a pretty fish. Is there a link to a photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    BTw, I'm not sure if it was from your daphnia or from the ones I myself collected almost a year ago, but one of the critter keepers containing blackworms suddenly sprouted a daphnia culuture! I picked up a small sweaterbox at the dollar store to set up another daphnia culture-now I have two. Looks like all the fish may enjoy some good munchies.
    Big and orange or small and green -- magna or pulex? Pulex has a way of just popping up at times but as its summer I bet its magna. Keep several cultures going and add a sponge filter or at least an airstone if you can. They always crash. Green water feedings are the best for non crashing.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Bad news on the grindals-they seem to have dissapeared. Everything was going great, and soon I was seeing the seething mass of worms attacking shrimp pellets and cheerios that everyone describes. Then, right when I was about ready to harvest them, they all dissapeared! Digging through the substrate revealed only a few worms...which seem to have dissapeared by now too. I also discovered 2 millipedes in the dirt with them. I'm unsure of whether or not these millipedes consumed the grindals...but I can't think of any other explanation.
    Is the medium drying out? Keep it real moist. Maybe they will come back. I don't know about millipedes. Check out a place called The Bug Farm on the internet. I think they are near you and sell live foods. Did you ever try contacting Roger Brousseau?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    For the kretseri, how'd your friend manage it?
    I have to ask. I was just told he did.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Whats your method for all those nothos? There seem to be as many techniques as people...lol
    Keep it simple. I breed in trios or groups in 10-20 gallon tanks with corner filters running steady but not too strong. I have lots of java fern, moss and anubias with some duckweed. I place a 6-8 inch in diameter 2-3 inch tall weighted down with small stones plastic container filled with an inch of pre-boiled, rinsed peat moss. I collect the peat every 2-4 weeks and dry until damp but flufferable and store at 75-78F in a good plastic bag loosely filled with air and labeled as to hatching date and species. I keep the peats in a styro box with the lid slightly cracked open for circulation. When ready I put the peat in 3 inches of water in a wide low open hatching container maybe 10 x10 inches with soft water with a bit of hard water added for stability and a little najas or java moss. The fry hatch in 5-24 hours and I feeed green water and baby brine shrimp from day one and usually just baby brine from day 2-3. After day 3-4 I add a pint of hard water from a healthy tank every day until i fill up the hatching try -- it's like 6 inches tall. This gets the fry slowly into my tap water's chemistry and out of velvet prone soft acid water. Then its just 2 feedings a day on good live or frozen food (after they grow a bit) and in 4 weeks they sex out and in 3 months they are pretty mature. Nothos do not like strong airflow or filtration. Keep it calm. Breeders are fed blackworms (for fertility), bloodworms, daphnia, grindals, mosquito larvae and brine shrimp. Blackworms are important in the diet. I keep the Nothos in hard water but when I want to breed them I slowly change it over to slightly soft by 1/3 water changes each day for 3 or so days. Breed and hatch in soft and raise and maintain in hard. Many Nothos like easy ones such as guentheri, melanosplius and foerschi breed and hatch well in hard water. That's it. They are small, active, bold, gorgeous fish that live only one year or so. They can be very prolific too. Check out the great site called Nothobranchius Information Centre -- it will knock your socks off.

    Bobby

  5. #29

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    Hmmm....here is a (very cruddy) picture. The male was darker in life and much more vibrant(he was in between displys during this shot)-I tried to set it to lower exposure to get a more realistic effect and he blacked out completely sans the white spots. You can see a bit of the purple sheen that was quite prevalent on him when he was at an angle or displaying to a female. His chest, like that of a paradise fish, was darkest.




    for grindals, the medium was about the consistency of garden soil-guess I will water it a bit. I forgot to contact Roger-and right now am having trouble with getting to my mailbox(on this comp) is he back from his collecting trip?

    I'll look the site up. Are there any other reccomendations for good starter nothos? I've seen a few that were red and white on aquabid, but forgot the species(if there was one) and location number....all I remember is that they were up in flames...lol. i'm willing to bet that pretty much all the species are gorgeous in life(off to look for pics).
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  6. #30

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    Hi Nflytrap,

    What a weird looking fish. I've never seen anything like that. Good luck working with them.

    Keep the grindals pretty moist, maybe a bit damper than garden soil.

    Good starter Nothos are guentheri, foerschi, korthausae and melanospilus. All 2 month incubation periods.

    I just hatched what looks like 15 or so Notho. kaufensis Mambova. There were alot more but they were belly sliders which bugs me as I can't tell if they are belly sliders because I wet the peat too soon or too late. If I get a good survival rate and sex ratio you could try a pair or trio of these. I will just have to see how they develop. They are a big thick robust beautiful new Notho. 5 months incubation on the eggs though! I love them. They throw a red, blue and mix color forms. Very interesting patterning.

    Bobby

  7. #31

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    Update.


    Female looks slimmer now....no sign of any babies though. Since this place is so overgrown at the surface I could very well be missing them. Just in case, I sprinkled a bit of Hikari 'First Bites'(it was somewhere round .75 on Big Als couldn't resist it-turned out to be perfect heterandria colony food...fine powder).

    Good/ bad news on the bluespots. I found one of the females brutally dead a few days ago. Quite odd...but I guess the amount of javamoss prevented me from seeing the conflict. From previous experience, when a killing happens once and no action is taken another will follow suite. I inserted a plexiglass divider to seperate them. Yesterday and today I turned the plexiglass diagonal to give the female a chance to see the male. She went up to him and again his color darkened and he started to flare and kick with his body. The females eye and the line underneath darkened and she responded. Then they kinda engaged in a "mock fight". Both fish puffed up there gillplates and when ones mouth advanced, the other fish retreated, keeping equal distance all the time(fish were not quite side by side and facing the same direction with heads titled towards opponent). The female was leaning over towards the ground though. The colors on both were breathtaking(marking on females gillplate and eyes brightened up quite a bit). It looked as if the two fish were holding a stick on each side and taking turns pushing it towards the other. Suddenly the pair broke up(guessing someone was going to go a bit farther than mock fighting) After a few more bouts lasting several minutes the female called it a day and went back to the otherside of the plexiglass. Today, she didn't seem as bold. The owner suggested a cooling and then warming, though I'm unsure how to go about that. I can't tell if the female is growing eggs but all that food has to go somewhere! They prefer living food but I have managed to get them to accept frozen bloodworms(but they seem to hunt highly by sight). They will even grab falling pellets if they are in the right spot, but if it hits the ground and stops moving they usuallly lose interest.


    For nothobranchius-have you tried coconut coir? It doesn't acidify things as much as peat does...might eliminate the need for weaning them to hard water. Also, do they only accept live foods as mentioned? If so, I'd probably have to have a thriving grindalworm culture and more to feed em.

    Off to find the site.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  8. #32

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    Hi, Nflytrap,

    I think one of my young monty females just dropped a few fry -- maybe 4 -- so your's should be starting soon too. I recently took the adult angels out of the tank so a couple of batches of fry can survive. The angels are in the latipinna x petenensis molly tank. They had dropped 3 batches and I only wanted the first batch of 30 fry for a next generation so in went the angels and a week later I just had the 30 largest fry left. The angels have ben a great plan. They get live food and I do not have to raise 100's of fry and then cull them out. The tanks stay cleaner longer and I save on expensive brine shrimp eggs. I wish I had thought of this years ago. Plus the angels are beautiful.

    The true petenensis are zooming up in growth -- amazing.

    The zonatus are full size now and one big 3 and 1/2 inch male is gorgeous. The top half of his caudal has long long extended fin rays. This is one of the truly graceful fish. I wish I had the other FINCA population of the species back as it is 2 inches larger and even more impressive. Then its sister species Gnatholebias hoignei has extended 2 inch fin rays down the whole caudel. Incredible looking. Its too bad these species are hard to breed as they are big, beautiful, unusual looking, peaceful and bold.

    Several people are using coir for peat spawners and like it. More are mixing it half and half with peat. I've never had a pH problem with peat as I boil it in hard alkaline water for an hour and then rinse it well. I prefer peat as it stimulates breeding and mirrors the soft mud of the wild ponds. Also it holds moisture better for long storage of eggs whereas coir can dry out if not watched. Fish change very easily from soft to hard to back again water if you go slow -- 1/4 a day. Killies live better in the harder alkaline water and breed best in the soft acid water. Discus breeders have found that discus breed best in soft acid water but discus fry grow faster and bigger in hard alkaline water -- calcium for bones! So the careful going back and forth is good. The old pre-WW II breeders of fish always conditioned their fish to breed in spring and summer and used ideal breeding water then and then rested the fish. Today, too many people treat breedin like a machine and always breed their fish which burns them out. Nature gives them a rest and we should too. We keep alot of fish too hot -- 75 F and above and feed to heavy all the time. Alot of tropicals like it 72-74F and need a light diet and then conditioning for breeding. Plus fish eat less when adult. The great thing about live foods is they condition fish so fast -- especially worms. Some fish -- like discus, zonatus, hoignei and cardinals need it hot 80F and above -- but not most tetras and livebearers. If you can ever find old issues of the great AQUARIUM MAGAZINE from the 1930's-1950's you will find a wonderful philosophy of fish keeping summarized each month in the "Calender" section at the start of each issue. One day, maybe I can copy some of these for you.

    Nothos do not require live food but they do love it. They do need blackworms for conditioning for breeding. They will eat frozen bloodworms and brine shrimp. The beginning species like guentheri and foerschi eat all sorts of food but rarely dry food. Nothos are just not a dry food eater. They will also eat beef heart mixtures.

    Did the grindals come back?

    Bobby

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