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Thread: Death toll rising :(

  1. #17
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    Bio-Spyra is a bacterial culture... if I understand your flow through system right, then each tank has a water source dripping into it, and is draining at the same rate? this seems a little dangerous to me, like a flood in the making... if that is how you are doing it, then you will need to put Bio Spyra in each tank, which is probably to expensive, it averages 10 bucks a packet.

    If you have all the tanks hooked together and they are draining to a common sump, and the sump then drains to the world, then that is a much better setup if you ask me. In that case, you simply put the bio-spira in the very first tank in the loop and let the bacteria flow through the system.
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    I feel like such a newbie haha - Ive never had to contend with this many tanks at once. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

    Actually they all have a 1/8 inch water input and a 3/4 inch overflow.. which flows through a 3/4 inch flex hose into a 2 inch pvc tree that flows into a 50 gallon sump... Ive had 0 probs - i tested it by running 3/4 inch main line directly into each "branch" of the pvc tree.. works prefect.

    It was much more efficent for me to do this instead of a flow through closed curcuit system. Ive read many killi folks are using these types of drip systems now.
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  3. #19
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
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    Using old water from an existing tank does not help you out with the cycling process.
    To seed a new tank you would need the filter floss or gravel from the old tank placed in the new tank. This would have helped to jump start the cycling of the new tanks, but you are still looking at about a 4 week wait time till it gets established.
    Around 2 weeks is when the ammonia spike hits, then shortly afterwards the nitrite will spike. Then it is safe to place fish in the tanks.


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  4. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (elgecko @ May 06 2005,1:28)]Using old water from an existing tank does not help you out with the cycling process.
    actually it does..just not as fast as taking gravel or something with real surface area..
    but water will contain enough bacteria to colonize the new tank..just slowly.
    I agree a handfull of gravel from an established tank is much better..but if water is all you have, its better than nothing..

    I would run the drip system 24/7.
    that will keep everything nice and stable.
    turning the drip on and off could result in fluctuating water conditions, best to just keep it running all the time.
    but make sure its not TOO much water dripping in!
    you want a slow steady drip, so that the heaters wont have any problems keeping up with the cold water dripping in.
    I was dripping 12 gallons a day into my 40 gallon discus tank, approx 25% water change every day.

    (actually less than 25%..because "new" and "old" water drains out..not just "old"..I never bothered to try to figure out the real percent..I just knew that 12 gallons of new water a day was more then sufficient..)

    it was 12 gallons a day only because the dripper nozzle was rated for 1/2 gallon an hour..I could have actually used much less.
    5 gallons a day would have been fine.
    If you are dripping in anywhere between 10% and 25% of the tank volume a day thats plenty.

    here is how I did mine..

    http://www.geocities.com/scottychaos/discuspage.htm

    Scot

  5. #21
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    What Elgecko said is dead on. I tried an experimenting with replacing the water from existing tanks, but with new filter media. It staves things off temporarily. Seasoned filter media with new water is far superior to "aged water" and new filter media.

    Nitrosamonas bacteria break down ammonia into also toxic nitrite. then nitrobacter bacteria break down the nitrites into safer nitrates.

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