User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 25 to 32 of 40

Thread: Chromaphyosemion splendopleure

  1. #25

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    107
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Glad to hear your having better luck on the eggs - thats a great shot!
    <a href=\"http://www.goodeids.com/\">
    http://www.goodeids.com/banners/gotgoodeids_banner.gif</a>

  2. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,211
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well now I've got two fry in the water incubation container! Lots of cyclops and whatnot swimming around.

    One looks much smaller than the other...don't know if it is normal or not or just younger. They don't seem to be eager "hunters" as the Nothos were. Seem content just to stay in one spot and perhaps wait for food to pass by. I haven't seen them eat yet but added a couple BBS just in case.

    Eggs on peat are doing well [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  3. #27

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    houston, texas
    Posts
    545
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Good job. The peat eggs should be about ready too so you might want to put them in water. Chromos grow slower than Nothos so they don't have to be such pigs as fry but they will eat. Keep them clean with plants and snails. Once they are strong in a few days you can slowly change them over to harder water if you are using RO but do it slowly a little bit a day. If you breed and incubate in soft water you will get more fry.

    Bobby

  4. #28

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,211
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, it appears that I waited a bit too long on the eggs on peat. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img] I checked this morning and found one obviously eyed up egg-the others were nowhere to be seen. It seems that unlike Notho eggs these eggs don't develop the golden iris to let you know they are completely eyed up. Even the eyes of the fry look completely black right now.

    Looks like until I collect again the # of fry will be set at 3 for now.

    The parents appear to be taking a little break from spawning despite the plumpness of the females. Either that or they are hiding those eggs real well! They are currently in normal tapwater. I heard that recently our source of water is surface water which is said by the water company to be soft. Unfortunately no test kit around to confirm this one. I've been scanning the surface of the adult tank for fry but so far haven't seen any. Theirs lots of duckweed so they would probably be missed by my eyes anyway. I'll keep you guys updated.


    ~Joseph
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  5. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    houston, texas
    Posts
    545
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi N,

    If your water is soft call the water company and get the reading on the calcium and the reading on the total dissolved solids. A good lfs should also know this so you could call them. Also ask the water company what the pH is. Northern California can have very soft acid water and this is why the area has always been a good breeding area for fish. If you have soft acid water out of the tap that is great but then you should keep a tsp of non-iodized salt per 2 gallons of water with the Nothos and think about harding the water for the swords -- that might be why they are dying or not producing as much as they can. Swords hate soft acid water. Take water to a lfs and have them test it for you. It is usually free. Just tell them you are loosing fish and think it may be the pH and hardness. You need to know your basic numbers here as basic water chemistry is crucial to breeding.

    Bobby

  6. #30

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,211
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bobby: I'll definetly be taking some water in for testing. From what I can decipher from the brochure we are one of the maybe 1000 or so homes which are receiving water from this source...everyone else is getting well water. Only a test would allow us to find out. Not too sure but I feel this change was pretty recent. I remember a few months ago that I got lots of water deposits on the glass when I allowed the water to evaporate.

    ~Joseph
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  7. #31

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    houston, texas
    Posts
    545
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi N,

    Good as that hard water will keep the Chromo production down but probably not the Nothos as they are more adaptable. That's the only draw back with killies. They can grow and live well in reasonablely hard water but for really good breeding results they need the soft slightly acid water. Peat will drop it some and if you buy the bushels of peat and research the company's acidity number for that peat -- call their 800 number -- you can get a peat that will acidify hard alkaline water. It takes a peat that reads 4.5 to 5 pH from the company's tests. They know that information. Be careful though, boil it in an enamel pan first for an hour and rinse well in hard water and then use -- as the real acid stuff can plunge the water chemistry and kill the fish. Might be good to get a pH tester and dry run the effect of peat on your water. You can put the peat in a corner filter between floss layers or in an old nylon of your Mom's or a nylon filter bag or just the peat from the breeding container. It is best not to use real acid peat for breeding -- read Morenski's article in the latest JAKA -- as it kills the eggs but acid peat is great for water conditioning. RO is safer and easier though -- usually a 85% RO/ 15% hard tap water mix down slowly over several days is this best. It's not real expensive when you just use some for small breeding tanks. You will see egg production climb in Chromos. Don't let the stores trick you into buying products to make hard water soft. It's either peat, rainwater, RO water or DI water -- unless you have soft tap water.

    Bobby

    Bobby

  8. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,211
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It would be great if my tapwater came as naturally soft. Of course that would create problems for a few of my fish(swordtails). How would I go about making the water harder? Seems like you'd need certain minerals added. I've seen mixtures marketed for adding minerals to RO water(RO right etc. etc.) but they seem very expensive for what they do considering that most people get hard water out of the tap.

    The peat article was a good one. I never would have thought the peat would make such a big difference in your breeding efforts.

    Do you have an RO unit at your place by any chance? One of those seems like it would be a very useful thing for keeping soft water fish.

    ~Joseph
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula &#39;Red Dragon&#39;(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •